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I have an object that looks like this:

var obj = {
    a: "text",
    b: "text 2",
    c: "text 3",
    ...
}

and I have a bunch of strings that look like this:

var stringA = "http://{{a}}.something.com/",
    stringB = "http://something.{{b}}.com/",
    stringC = "http://something.com/{{c}}";

I want to replace {{(\w)}} with it's equivalent by going through obj and checking if it has my matched value for every string, but I'm sure there is a better and faster way to do so.

Any ideas?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Douglas Crockford wrote a function called supplant that does almost exactly what you want. I've altered the function slightly to match your double curly braces -

if (typeof String.prototype.supplant !== 'function') {
    String.prototype.supplant = function (o) {
        return this.replace(/{{([^{}]*)}}/g, function (a, b) {
            var r = o[b];
            return typeof r === 'string' ? r : a;
        });
    };
}

var obj = {
    a: "text",
    b: "text 2",
    c: "text 3"
}

var stringA = "http://{{a}}.something.com/",
    stringB = "http://something.{{b}}.com/",
    stringC = "http://something.com/{{c}}";

alert(stringA.supplant(obj));

Demo - http://jsfiddle.net/saZGg/

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Beautiful, thanks! :) –  Eli Oct 18 '11 at 13:49
    
any way to map deep objects with dot notation? –  Zain Shaikh May 13 '13 at 16:29
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var arr = /(.*){{(\w)}}(.*)/.exec(stringA);
arr[2] = obj[arr[2]];
arr.shift(); // remove full string at start
var newString = arr.join("");
  • Generally run a regular expression on the string,
  • execute and turn it into an array.
  • Swap one of the groups for the value in your object hash
  • join the array into your "compiled" string.

Or use one of the .replace solutions which is arguebly more elegant.

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2  
.exec will return the string itself as its first argument, so you'll end up with the unaltered string prepended. –  pimvdb Oct 18 '11 at 11:33
    
@pimvdb >_< my bad –  Raynos Oct 18 '11 at 11:52
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This should do it:

function format(str, values) {
    return str.replace(/{{(\w)}}/g, function(match, name) {
        return values[name] || match;
    });
}

It just looks up whether the object has a property with the captured name. If not, nothing is replaced.

Usage:

var str = format(stringA, obj);
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