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It's basically a binary tree which first searches against hash to decide whether it's left or right:

if(hash > rec.hash){
  off = rec.left;
  entoff = rec.off + (sizeof(uint8_t) + sizeof(uint8_t));
} else if(hash < rec.hash){
  off = rec.right;
  entoff = rec.off + (sizeof(uint8_t) + sizeof(uint8_t)) +
    (hdb->ba64 ? sizeof(uint64_t) : sizeof(uint32_t));
} else {
  if(!rec.kbuf && !tchdbreadrecbody(hdb, &rec)) return false;
  int kcmp = tcreckeycmp(kbuf, ksiz, rec.kbuf, rec.ksiz);
  if(kcmp > 0){
    off = rec.left;
    ...
  } else if(kcmp < 0){
    off = rec.right;
    ...

Here's how hash calculated:

static uint64_t tchdbbidx(TCHDB *hdb, const char *kbuf, int ksiz, uint8_t *hp){
  ...
  uint32_t hash = 751;
  const char *rp = kbuf + ksiz;
  while(ksiz--){
    ...
    hash = (hash * 31) ^ *(uint8_t *)--rp;
  }
  *hp = hash;
  ...
}

But it seems the way the hash calculated can't ensure the orderness of keys,

is it a bug?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's not trying to order the keys by the value of the keys themselves. It's ordering them first by hash, and then by key value in the case of a hash collision.

So no, it is not a bug. Unless you can cite documentation saying that this type of table orders by key value.

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This is not a type of tree, this is just an ordering on the keys. So the nature of the operations will depend on the type of tree. –  Dietrich Epp Oct 18 '11 at 12:12
    
Is it safe to balance on?IMO some records may not be found after rebalancing. –  Je Rog Oct 18 '11 at 12:15
    
What do you mean by balance, then? Normally, when balancing a tree, records are NOT lost and NOT reordered. Balancing a tree is practically transparent. –  Dietrich Epp Oct 18 '11 at 12:19

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