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I am using Qt but this is a generic C++ question. My case is simple, I have a class Constants which has a constant static member which I want it to be initialized after certain function calls are made.

Constants.h

#ifndef CONSTANTS_H
#define CONSTANTS_H

class Constants
{
public:

    static const char* const FILE_NAME;
};

#endif // CONSTANTS_H

Constants.cpp

#include "constants.h"
#include <QApplication>

const char* const Constants::FILE_NAME = QApplication::applicationFilePath().toStdString().c_str();

main.cpp

#include <QtGui/QApplication>
#include "mainwindow.h"
#include "constants.h"
#include <QDebug>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    QApplication a(argc, argv);

    qDebug()<< "name: "<<Constants::FILE_NAME;
    //for those who are unfamiliar with Qt, qDebug just prints out
    return a.exec();
}

When compiling I got:

QCoreApplication::applicationFilePath: Please instantiate the QApplication object first

So problem here is obvious. When QApplication's static function is called in Constants.cpp QApplication is not installed by Qt yet. I need to somehow wait until QApplication a(argc, argv); line is passed in main.cpp

is it possible and if not what else could you suggest to overcome this?

thanks

share|improve this question
    
Not declaring it as a constant? It's definitely not a constant since it relies on some state at application startup. –  m0skit0 Oct 18 '11 at 11:39
    
but I need it to be read only once it is assigned? –  destan Oct 18 '11 at 11:41
2  
I could be wrong, but QApplication::applicationFilePath().toStdString() looks like a temporary to me, in which case you're storing a pointer to invalid data. –  Mike Seymour Oct 18 '11 at 11:48
    
For example: use an object (like a String class instance), assign it NULL and check if it's NULL (which means it's not assigned yet). –  m0skit0 Oct 18 '11 at 12:18
    
You can use .toAscii() instead of .toStdString().c_str(). –  alexisdm Oct 19 '11 at 9:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One option is to return it from a function, keeping it in a static variable. This will be initialised when the function is first called.

char const * const file_name()
{
    // Store the string, NOT the pointer to a temporary string's contents
    static std::string const file_name =
        QApplication::applicationFilePath().toStdString();
    return file_name.c_str();
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. It is even better. –  Nawaz Oct 18 '11 at 11:48
    
Although 2 answers result the same and work well, your answer seems more secure. thanks –  destan Oct 18 '11 at 12:37
    
Bad idea to return a local pointer. –  ValekHalfHeart Aug 29 '13 at 21:00
    
@ValekHalfHeart: Bad idea to return a pointer to an automatic local. This one is static, so will still exist when the function returns. –  Mike Seymour Aug 29 '13 at 22:57
    
@MikeSeymour Right. That never occurred to me. –  ValekHalfHeart Aug 29 '13 at 23:17

Typical solution:

#ifndef CONSTANTS_H
#define CONSTANTS_H

class Constants
{
public:

    static const char* const getFILE_NAME();
};

#endif // CONSTANTS_H

And in cpp

#include "constants.h"
#include <QApplication>

const char* const Constants::getFILE_NAME()
{
    static const char* const s_FILE_NAME = QApplication::applicationFilePath().toStdString().c_str();

    return s_FILE_NAME;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Simple and correct. –  Nawaz Oct 18 '11 at 11:44
2  
Aren't you storing a pointer to the contents of a temporary string? Or does toStdString() return a reference to something persistent? –  Mike Seymour Oct 18 '11 at 11:46
    
@Nawaz: even thread safe under c++11 IIRC –  sehe Oct 18 '11 at 11:46
1  
@MikeSeymour: move that comment to OP? –  sehe Oct 18 '11 at 11:46

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