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How exactly can I do this?

My dilemma is that I can expand my child element to the height of the parent div no problem, but sometimes my child element is larger then the content area and gets cut off.

Look at the following markup and css:

Markup

<div class="parent">
    <div class="child">hello<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />there<br /><br />  </div>
</div>

CSS

.parent
{
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    overflow: auto;
    background: pink;
}

.child
{
    background: orange;
    height: 100%;
}

This fiddle shows the problem: The child div doesn't get 100% height of the parent div - (as you can see in the above fiddle - the scrollable area is pink)

share|improve this question
    
it depends on certains factors, espacially the values of width, height, padding, border, margin. Can you provide an example ? –  BiAiB Oct 18 '11 at 11:54
    
Are your child div's floated ? If so, you may need a clearfix. –  aziz punjani Oct 18 '11 at 11:57
    
I have edited the question to show the OP's problem clearly –  Danield Sep 1 '13 at 6:37

2 Answers 2

div.child { height:100%; overflow-y:scroll; }
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1) Wrap the parent div in a container with overflow:auto.

2) Set display:table to the parent div -

Now the child gets 100% height of parent

FIDDLE

Markup:

<div class="wpr">
    <div class="parent-table">
        <div class="child">hello<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />there<br /><br /></div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS

.wpr
{
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    overflow: auto; 
}

.parent-table
{
    background: pink;
    width: 100%;
    display:table;
}
.child
{
    background: orange;
    height: 100%;
}
share|improve this answer

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