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In C++ I often use RAII-style objects to make code more reliable and allocate them on stack to make code more performant (and to avoid bad_alloc).

But creating an object of concrete class on stack violates the dependency inversion (DI) principle and prevents mocking this object.

Consider the following code:

struct IInputStream
{
    virtual vector<BYTE> read(size_t n) = 0;
};

class Connection : public IInputStream
{
public:
    Connection(string address);
    virtual vector<BYTE> read(size_t n) override;
};

struct IBar
{
    virtual void process(IInputStream& stream) = 0;
};

void Some::foo(string address, IBar& bar)
{
    onBeforeConnectionCreated();
    {
        Connection conn(address);
        onConnectionCreated();
        bar.process(conn);
    }
    onConnectionClosed();
}

I can test IBar::process, but I also want to test Some::foo, without creating real Connection object.

Surely I can use a factory, but it will significantly complicate code and introduce heap-allocation.
Also, I don't like to add the Connection::open method, I prefer to construct completely initialized and fully functional objects.

I would make Connection type a template parameter for Some (or for foo if extract it as a free function), but I'm not sure that it's right way (templates look like a black magic to many people, so I prefer to use dynamic polymorphism)

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2  
Templates shouldn't be black magic to more or less competent C++ programmer, I see no reason to avoid them. Also I don't think heap allocation is that expensive (this, of course, depends on the software you write), so I see no reason to avoid it either (when used with smart pointers). –  Alex B Oct 18 '11 at 12:15
2  
@Alex B: there sort of is a reason to avoid them, although I agree that it's not because they're "black magic". It's because if everything is injected via template parameters, then everything you write is a template, your library is header-only, and that can get quite cumbersome in terms of either compilation or distribution. Although, I suppose that with care you could unit test the header-only library, then build from it a TU that only contains the instantiations that the application needs. –  Steve Jessop Oct 18 '11 at 12:23
1  
RAII and DI work great together, so the title is misleading, your issue is Stack Allocation vs DI. –  Matthieu M. Oct 18 '11 at 12:27
    
@Steve Jessop: most of my code is header-only, because it's easier to #include header rather than link .lib compiled with right compiler settings (easier than autolinking and -s/-gds/etc suffixes) –  Abyx Oct 18 '11 at 13:22

2 Answers 2

What you are doing right now is "force-coupling" the RAII class and the service provider class (which, if you want testability, should really be an interface instead). Address this by:

  1. abstracting Connection into IConnection
  2. have a separate ScopedConnection class that provides RAII on top of that

For example:

void Some::foo(string address, IBar& bar)
{
    onBeforeConnectionCreated();
    {
        ScopedConnection conn(this->pFactory->getConnection());
        onConnectionCreated();
        bar.process(conn);
    }
    onConnectionClosed();
}
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1  
And accept that ScopedConnection doesn't need to be mocked, it's "safe" to use the real version even in tests that are supposed to isolate Some::foo. Or if that's unacceptable, grit your teeth and inject it as a template parameter, or use scoped_ptr to provide the RAII, which as a standard class (or 3rd party if you're still on C++03) is an acceptable hard dependency. –  Steve Jessop Oct 18 '11 at 12:16
    
That's what I wrote about factory. In order to follow your answer, I should create a factory just for Connection, or factory for a lot of unrelated classes (as you suggest). Bring this factory to Some through a lot of layers (or make it global). –  Abyx Oct 18 '11 at 12:53
    
@Abyx: The factory would be a prime candidate for DI, which would be preferable to passing it through manually or having a global. But you need it to increase abstraction. –  Jon Oct 18 '11 at 12:57

By "I can use a factory, but it will significally complicate code and introduce heap-allocation" I meant the following steps:

Create abstract class and derive Connection from it

struct AConnection : IInputStream
{
    virtual ~AConnection() {}
};

Add factory method to Some

class Some
{
.....
protected:
    VIRTUAL_UNDER_TEST AConnection* createConnection(string address);
};

Replace stack-allocated connecton by smart pointer

unique_ptr<AConnection> conn(createConnection(address));
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