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i want to implement binary_search with pointers

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int binary_p(int x[],int size,int target){
    int *p=&x[0];
    int *q=&x[size];

    while(p<q){
               int mid=(p+q)>>2;
               if (target==x[*mid]) return 1;
               else if(target<x[*mid])  q=mid-1;
               else p=mid+1;





               }   
    return -1;


}
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int x[]={2,4,6,7,9,10,12};
    int size=sizeof(x)/sizeof(int);
    int target=9;
    cout<<binary_p(x,size,target)<<endl;
    system("PAUSE");
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

but here is error list

  prog.cpp: In function ‘int binary_p(int*, int, int)’:
prog.cpp:10: error: invalid operands of types ‘int*’ and ‘int*’ to binary ‘operator+’
prog.cpp:11: error: invalid type argument of ‘unary *’
prog.cpp:12: error: invalid operands of types ‘int*’ and ‘int’ to binary ‘operator*’
prog.cpp:12: error: invalid conversion from ‘int’ to ‘int*’
prog.cpp:13: error: invalid conversion from ‘int’ to ‘int*’
prog.cpp: In function ‘int main(int, char**)’:
prog.cpp:30: warning: ignoring return value of ‘int system(const char*)’, declared with attribute warn_unused_result

please could anybody give me advise

share|improve this question
    
You can't do >>2 (or /4 for that matter) on pointers. Pointer arithmetic only allows addition and subtraction. Why not work with indices instead? –  Kerrek SB Oct 18 '11 at 12:17
    
system executes an external command... is that what you really want? –  crashmstr Oct 18 '11 at 12:19
    
Recursive call to binary_p missing? –  another.anon.coward Oct 18 '11 at 12:22
2  
@another.anon.coward: Binary search does not have to be implemented recursively, a loop will do just fine. –  Björn Pollex Oct 18 '11 at 12:45
    
@BjörnPollex: Thanks! Duly Noted ... its been a while but that should not have been a reason for me to overlook the logic implemented here :\ –  another.anon.coward Oct 18 '11 at 12:57

5 Answers 5

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Here is the working code.

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int binary_p(int x[],int size,int target){
    int *p = &x[0];
    int *q = &x[size - 1 ];

    while( *p < *q ){
        int mid = (*p + *q) >> 2;
        if (target == x[mid]) 
            return 1;
        else if (target < x[mid])  
            *q = mid - 1;
        else 
            *p = mid + 1;
    }   
    return -1;
}
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int x[] = {2,4,6,7,9,10,12};
    int size = sizeof(x) / sizeof(int);
    int target = 9;
    cout << binary_p(x,size,target) << endl;
    //system("PAUSE");
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
share|improve this answer
    
one question @Avinash ,we are dividing (*p+*q) by 4?because sizeof(int) is 4 or why?thanks for help –  dato datuashvili Oct 18 '11 at 12:31
4  
Does this really work? Try it on int x[] = { 1000, 2000, 100000 }; or something similar. The calculation of mid is completely wrong; you can't use the values in the original array to create an index into the array, since they are unrelated. –  James Kanze Oct 18 '11 at 12:36
3  
As @James pointed out, this code is not correct. –  Björn Pollex Oct 18 '11 at 12:44

You can't add (or shift, or divide) two pointers, but subtracting them gives an integral type (which you can add and divide), so you can write something like:

int* mid = p + (q - p) / 2;

to obtain a pointer to the middle point.

share|improve this answer
    
With indexes, this approach also prevents overflows, so it should be preferred anyway. –  Björn Pollex Oct 18 '11 at 12:19
    
@BjörnPollex Or you could use an unsigned type for indexing, and count on the modulo arithmetic giving you the correct value in the end. (Or you're using 64 bit integers, and you know your array can't be that big:-).) But in general, yes. This is the only correct way to determine the mid-point. –  James Kanze Oct 18 '11 at 12:40

You can't do this:

  int mid=(p+q)>>2

Adding pointers doesn't have any meaning. You are thinking of int* as int, but it might not be so, and C doesn't automatically treat them as such. You could cast, but then it won't be standard.

You can subtract pointers that are in the same array. That returns an int. Also, you can add an int to pointer.

So,

  int* mid=p + ((q-p) / 2);

would work. mid should be an int *, so you need to change the rest of your code to work with that. You have similar errors elsewhere. For example, the next line

   if (target==x[*mid]) return 1;

didn't make sense even if mid was an int (*mid isn't allowed on int), but now mid points right at the element, so you want:

   if (target==*mid) return 1;

and, so on.

share|improve this answer
    
but why does it shows me -1?as a output? –  dato datuashvili Oct 18 '11 at 12:22
    
Because you probably have a bug. use the debugger to figure out what is going on. If you want help, you need to post your new code. –  Lou Franco Oct 18 '11 at 13:00

You cannot add pointers. If you really insist on doing it the hard way (instead of using indexes), you should use std::distance and std::advance functions.

share|improve this answer
    
You CAN add, subtract pointers. Consider this: int a[5]; int *ptr1, ptr2; ptr1 = a; ptr2 = a[4]; ptr2-ptr1 == 4 –  friendzis Oct 18 '11 at 12:19
4  
@friendzis: In your example you subtract pointers, but you don't add them. That is not possible. –  Björn Pollex Oct 18 '11 at 12:20
    
@BjörnPollex: 1. it IS possible, though doesn't make sense. 2. It's just not straightforward - you have to explicitly tell the compiler to take integral values of pointers, i.e. in subtraction case it is done implicitly. Subtraction: a-b; addition: (int)a + (int)b –  friendzis Oct 19 '11 at 9:09
    
@friendzis: When you do this you are adding integers, not pointers. If you dereference a pointer that results from such an addition, I am pretty sure you get undefined behavior. –  Björn Pollex Oct 19 '11 at 9:53
    
@BjörnPollex: well, but pointers ARE the very same integers. Their value is integer, that has size of your architecture e.g. 64bits/16Bytes. Pointer type denotes what RESIDES at memory location that has the same value as pointer's value. Therefore when you add pointers you get pretty much defined behavior. ` int arr[2] = {1, 2}; int ptr1 = arr; int *ptr2 = (int *)(1*sizeof(*arr)); int *ptr3 = (int)((int)ptr1 + (int)ptr2); printf("%d\n", *ptr3); // 2` This is pretty defined behavior. If you take two pointer pointing to actual data in your application, then it will –  friendzis Oct 19 '11 at 16:14
while(p<=q){
    int *mid=p+(q-p)/2;
    if (target==*mid) return 1;
    else if(target<*mid)  q=mid-1;
    else p=mid+1;
}   
return -1;
share|improve this answer

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