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To kick off my WCF service, I use the following:

selfHost = new ServiceHost(typeof(MyServiceClass));
selfHost.Open();

At some point this will create an instance of MyServiceClass. Will it create a single instance or an instance per request?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to restrict it to a single instance you can instantiate your service class outside and the pass the instance into the servicehost:

var myservice = new MyServiceClass();
selfHost = new ServiceHost(typeof(MyServiceClass), myservice); // forces singleton pattern
selfHost.Open();
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Note implementing this will require a change to MyServiceClass to add [ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode = InstanceContextMode.Single)]. InstanceContextMode is mentioned in another answer. –  Denise Skidmore Apr 24 '13 at 21:43
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By default it's an instance per request but you could change this. For example you could write your own IInstanceProvider and manage the life of the service class yourself.

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Can this be changed? –  spender Oct 18 '11 at 12:48
    
@spender, yes, it can. You could write a custom IInstanceProvider. For example this is commonly used with DI frameworks when you want to inject some dependencies into the service class. –  Darin Dimitrov Oct 18 '11 at 12:49
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All these answers are correct, but they seem more complex than what you are asking. The basics of whether it creates an instance per call, per session, or singleton are controlled by the InstanceContextMode which is an attribute on your service class. Start reading there.

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It will create instance per request. If you want a single instance you could use a static class. Static class exists for the lifetime of the application. They don't get reinstantiated every time there is a call or new WCF connection is made.

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Static service class is a bad idea. How is your static class going to implement the ServiceContract interface? –  ErnieL Oct 18 '11 at 14:32
    
Thats true, maybe i should be more specific, static class advantage might be used for server side only. –  neurotix Oct 19 '11 at 6:15
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