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Why would some compilers insist on qualifying members public members of template base class while the not requiring the same for non-template class? Please look at the following code listings:

Template class:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template <class T>
class TestImpl {
public: // It wont make a difference even if we use a protected access specifier here
    size_t vval_;
    TestImpl(size_t val = 0) : vval_(val) { }
};

template <class T>
class Test : public TestImpl<T> {
public:
    Test(size_t val) : TestImpl<T>(val) {
        cout << "vval_ : " << vval_ << endl; // Error: vval_ was not declared in this scope
        //! cout << "vval_ : " << TestImpl<T>::vval_ << endl; // this works, obviously
    }
};

int main() {
    Test<int> test1(7);

    return 0;
}

Non-template class:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class TestImpl {
public: // It wont make a difference even if we use a protected access specifier here
    TestImpl(size_t val = 0) : vval_(val) {}
    size_t vval_;
};

class Test : public TestImpl {
public:
    Test(size_t val) : TestImpl(val) {
        cout << "vval_ : " << vval_ << endl;
    }
};

int main() {
    Test test1(7);

    return 0;
}

The significant difference between the above code listings is that while the first listing uses template classes, the second one doesn't.

Now, both listings will compile fine with Microsoft's Visual Studio Compiler (cl) but the first listing WONT compile with both the Digital Mars Compiler (dmc) and Minimalist GNU for Windows (MinGW - g++) compiler. I will get an error like "vval_ was not declared in the scope" - an error I obviously understand what it means.

If I qualify access to the TestImpl's public variable vval_ using TestImpl<T>::vval_ the code works. In the second listing, the compilers do not complain when the derived class accesses the base class' vval_ variable without qualifying it.

With regard to the two compilers and possibly others, my question would be why I should be able to directly access (without qualifying) vval_ variable directly from a non-template class inheriting from a non-template class, while I cant do the same from a template class inheriting from a template class?

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You can also qualify the vval_ thus: this->vval_. –  Robᵩ Oct 18 '11 at 13:31
2  
    
@Rob: this->vval_ works in the derived class. When using "implemented in terms of a" kind of inheritance, where significant part of your implementation is in the base claas, it just feels unwieldy having to do this-> every place. Thanks –  John Gathogo Oct 18 '11 at 13:41
    
@visitor: revealing read –  John Gathogo Oct 18 '11 at 13:42
    
@JohnGathogo: If the identifier is dependent on the type arguments, but that dependency is not explicit in the code, you will need to explicitly state that dependency, and this-> will start not looking so bad... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 18 '11 at 13:59
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem you are facing is that for the compiler vval_ is not a dependent name, so it will try to look it up before the actual instantiation of the template with the type. At that point, the base type is not yet known to the compiler [*], and thus it does not consider the templated bases. Visual Studio does not perform the two phase lookup, and thus this is not required there.

The solution is transforming the identifier into a dependent identifier, which can be done in one of multiple ways. The simplest and recommended would be using this (as in this->vval_). By adding the explicit this, the compiler knows that vval_ can differ depending on the template arguments, it is now a dependent name, and it postpones lookup to the second phase (after argument substitution).

Alternatively, you can qualify the type that the identifier belongs to, as @mrozenau suggests, by using TestImpl<T>::vval_. Again that makes the identifier dependent on the template argument T and lookup is postponed. While both of them serve the ultimate purpose of postponing the lookup to a later time, this second approach has the extra side effect that dynamic dispatch will be disabled. In this particular case it does not matter, but if vval_ was actually a virtual function then this->f() would call the final overrider, while TestImpl<T>::f() would execute the overrider present in TestImpl<T>.

[*] During the first phase verification of templates, before the arguments are substituted into the template, the base type is not yet known. The reason for this is that different sets of arguments might trigger the selection of different specializations of the base template.

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You have to qualify vval_ with the TestImpl<T> to tell the compiler that it depends on the actual type of T in Test<T> (there might be some partial/explicit specializations of TestImpl<T> declared before the definition of Test<T> and it's instantiation that will change the meaning of vval_ in that context. In order to make the compiler aware of that, you have to tell that vval_ is (template parameter) dependent.

See also http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Name-lookup.html

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MSVC (Microsoft ...) has never been standard compliant when it comes to template code, so he's the odd one out :)

The problem is that templates are parsed in two phases:

  • The first phase is executed when the template is parsed, and any identifier that does not depend (explicitly) on template parameters should be resolved
  • The second phase is executed when the template is instanciated

In your case, the first phase fails because vval_ does not depend explicitly on a template parameter (is not a dependant name), thus it should be available.

A simple remedy is to qualify vval_, usually with this->, to mark it as dependent.

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It's not that bad actually, the only missing thing (required by standard) is two-phase name lookup. And it's not required to be a two-phase parsing, e.g. one can imagine compiler implementation which will just remember context at the point of template definition and use it for proper name lookup at the point of instantiation. –  Konstantin Oznobihin Oct 18 '11 at 14:17
    
@KonstantinOznobihin: I disagree with the not that bad. Name lookup is akin to overload resolution: what would say of a compiler that would always pick the last possible overload ? I understand they might wish not to pester the user with dependent names issues for usability, but you can do so without breaking the look-up :x –  Matthieu M. Oct 18 '11 at 14:23
    
@KonstantinOznobihin: Well... the standard determines that a dependent type in a template context must be preceded by the typename keyword (or dependent templates with template keyword) and VS ignores that requirement, making it quite easy to write non-portable code... It all depends on how you look at it –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 18 '11 at 14:29
    
Still, I think, absence of two-phase name-lookup hardly can be treated as 'has never been standard compliant when it comes to template code'. And when we come to a name-lookup, do you have any examples of good code which does rely on two-phase name-lookup to be performed? It's not that great to have this feature missing indeed, but your analogy with overload resolution is just incorrect. –  Konstantin Oznobihin Oct 18 '11 at 14:32
2  
@KonstantinOznobihin: consider: int x = 10; template <typename T> struct base { static int x; }; template <typename T> int base<T>::x = 1; template <typename T> struct derived : base<T> { void foo() { std::cout << x; } I believe that according to the standard (I would have to check), x in derived<T>::foo() refers to ::x not base<T>::x. Granted I have never found that issue in real code. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 18 '11 at 14:58
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