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This exercise here at lab is driving me nuts! Although it seems like a very easy task, I get errors and I really don't know where they come from.

Simple exercise:

  • With a BASH script, read an input, check if it is only a series of numbers, and print something out concatenated with it.

To do the number matching I use a simple regular expression. The code should be something like this:

#!/bin/bash

echo "amount: "
read AMOUNT
REGEX="^[0-9]*$"
if [[ $AMOUNT =~ $REGEX ]]
then
    echo "amount (in $US) = "$AMOUNT
else
    echo "invalid amount, or input is not a number, quitting"
fi

But no matter how I look at it, it spams an error: "amount.sh: 11: [[: not found" and even the professor is astonished.

What am I doing wrong?

(Using BASH shell v4.1.5, with Ubuntu 10.04.)

share|improve this question
    
Works here using bash 4.1.5 on Ubuntu 10.04. –  NPE Oct 18 '11 at 13:54
    
And here using bash 4.1.7 on Fedora 14 –  retracile Oct 18 '11 at 13:59
    
The code works perfectly fine on my machine, and I'm also using Ubuntu 10.04 with Bash 4.1.5. Also, this shouldn't have anything to do with your problem, but you have to escape the $ to print $US. –  Dennis Oct 18 '11 at 14:01
    
How do you run the script? By setting the executable or by running "bash amount.sh" from a shell? –  thiton Oct 18 '11 at 14:01
4  
You're probably invoking your script using sh script.sh instead of bash script.sh. In the Ubuntu box I'm using, /bin/sh is /bin/dash, which doesn't recognize [[ ]]. –  Idelic Oct 18 '11 at 14:08

2 Answers 2

I can't reproduce this on bash 3.2.39 (Ubuntu 8.04.01). You have a bug in your use of $US, but the [[ looks ok. I also tested with bash 4.1.10 (OpenSUSE 11).

It does not appear you have given us your entire script. It is complaining about line 11, but your script has the [[ on line 6.

Absurdly... make sure your [ is really the square bracket character and not some odd Unicode character that looks like a square bracket. You might just re-type the whole script given how short it is (or cut-and-paste it out of this question, as I did).

Do make sure you don't accidentally have Windows newlines (\r\n) on some of these lines. That can sometimes create problems like this (though I don't really believe this is the problem in this case).

For fun, switch to a single [ rather than [[. [ is actually an executable (/usr/bin/[). It probably won't handle the =~ operator, but you'd see if there were a change in behavior.

share|improve this answer

General improvements:

#!/bin/bash

echo "amount: "
read AMOUNT
REGEX='^[0-9]+$'
if [[ "$AMOUNT" =~ $REGEX ]]
then
    echo "amount (in \$US) = $AMOUNT"
else
    echo "invalid amount, or input is not a number, quitting"
fi

Many small quoting problem windows closed. I assumed that you require input (no characters in AMOUNT would be an error).

share|improve this answer
    
-1 Don't quote the $REGEX pattern. It's hard to find the documentation but if you quote the pattern it will be treated as a plain string. In bash, it is not necessary to quote variables within [[ ]] –  glenn jackman Oct 18 '11 at 15:29
    
@glennjackman: mmm you are right - I didn't realize that. fixed the answer (tested it too this time...) –  sehe Oct 18 '11 at 19:50
    
There is another improvement: read -p "amount: " AMOUNT will do a prompted input. –  f4m8 Oct 19 '11 at 10:47

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