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I'm having a spot of trouble with generics in C#. I have to store a number of generic objects together but their type parameter differs so I have made a non-generic interface which they implement. What I'm looking for is a way to convert back to the generic version, given a type object. I know I can do it with reflection but I was wondering if there was a better/more elegant solution.

The following code illustrates the problem:

interface ITable
{
   public Type Type { get; }
}

class Table<T> : ITable
{
   public Type Type { get{ return typeof(T); } }
}

class Program
{
   static void Main(string[] args)
   {
      var tables = new Dictionary<string, ITable>();
      ... //insert tables
      DoStuffWithTable(tables["my table"]); //This doesn't work
   }

   public static void DoStuffWithTable<T>(Table<T> table)
   {
      ...//Some work
   }
}

Is there a clean way for me to invoke the generic DoStuffWithTable method based on the instance of the Type object I can get from its interface method?

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As an aside - interestingly, this might work in C# 4.0 via dynamic - I'd have to double-check on generic resolution, though. –  Marc Gravell Apr 23 '09 at 9:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you are starting from a non-generic type (ITable), then the only way to do this is via reflection (MakeGenericMethod). It isn't very pretty or especially fast, but it works...

public static void DoStuffWithUntypedTable(ITable table)
{
    typeof(Program).GetMethod("DoStuffWithTable")
        .MakeGenericMethod(table.Type)
        .Invoke(null, new object[] { table });
}

As an aside - note that there is a bit of risk in assuming that an ITable is actually a Table<T> - you should probably verify that, and maybe also use an interface (ITable<T>).


Edit: if it really must be a Table<T>, then you can enforce this (including subclass support, such as FooTable : Table<Foo> as:

public static void DoStuffWithUntypedTable(object table)
{
    Type type = table.GetType();
    while (type != typeof(object))
    {
        if (type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition()
              == typeof(Table<>))
        {
            typeof(Program).GetMethod("DoStuffWithTable")
                .MakeGenericMethod(type.GetGenericArguments()[0])
                .Invoke(null, new object[] { table });
            return;
        }
        type = type.BaseType;
    }
    throw new ArgumentException("Not a Table<T> or subclass");
}
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1  
I think this is a case of using a sledgehammer to bang in a drawing pin. I think this is a design/understanding the language issue. I might be wrong though. I would class the above as a code smell (somewhere between a pungent brie and slightly out of date eggs). –  Skizz Apr 23 '09 at 9:58
    
Agree with the code smell –  Stefan Steinegger Apr 23 '09 at 10:00
    
Yes, but given the requirement, and the fact that the classes come from a 3rd party library, it is the only viable route. If you believe otherwise, please show with code ;-p –  Marc Gravell Apr 23 '09 at 11:18
    
Enforcing could be much simpler: typeof(Table<>).MakeGenericType(table.Type).IsInstanceOfType(table) –  configurator Apr 23 '09 at 12:10
    
@configurator - good spot; that would probably work fine. –  Marc Gravell Apr 23 '09 at 14:28

The problem is that you don't know the type at compile-time - which is what generics is tailored for.

To call a generic method where you only know the type argument at execution time, you basically need reflection - get the generic method, call MakeGenericMethod and then invoke the returned method.

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Yes, generics are not the solution to this problem, polymorphism may well be the answer you're looking for. –  Binary Worrier Apr 23 '09 at 9:23
    
I feared as much, but the generic method is in a third part library so there is no way to avoid it. –  Morten Christiansen Apr 23 '09 at 9:38

You need to cast, you actually need to know the actual type, unless it doesn't make sense.

DoStuffWithTable<MyType>((Table<MyType>)tables["my table"]);

You should consider to make the method not generic if you want to call it without knowing the actual type.

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+1 agreed, if you can't do that (which doesn't makes much sense anyway :P), just make DoStuffWithTable non generic and work with ITable –  eglasius Apr 23 '09 at 9:28

There is a misunderstanding here between generics and polymorphism. Generally, generics deal with things of a single type where the type is defined at compile time*, whereas polymorphism is about things of different types that exhibit common functionality defined as an interface or base type.

You seem to be trying to create a polymorphic type (things of different type that exhibit the same behaviour) where each polymorphic instance is defined by a generic type.

So, to update your code:

interface ITable
{
   void SomeCommonFunction ();
}

class Table<T> : ITable
{
   void SomeCommonFunction () { do something - T is known at compile time! }
}

class Program
{
   static void Main(string[] args)
   {
      var tables = new Dictionary<string, ITable>();
      ... //insert tables
      tables["my table"].SomeCommonFunction ();
   }
}

Now, if you want to do different things in SomeCommonFunction that is dependant on the type T, then you want to have specific instantiations of the Table type. C# doesn't allow for specialisations of generic type in the way that C++ can with its templates so you'll have to do:

class TableOfInt : ITable
{
   void SomeCommonFunction () { do something different! }
}

* You can define the type at run time in C# but that's getting into crazy reflection territory.

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