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I was wondering what was the best practice for initializing object attributes in Python, in the body of the class or inside the __init__ function?

i.e.

class A(object):
    foo = None

vs

class A(object):
   def __init__(self):
       self.foo = None
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3 Answers 3

up vote 23 down vote accepted

If you want the attribute to be shared by all instances of the class, use a class attribute:

class A(object):
    foo = None

This causes ('foo',None) to be a (key,value) pair in A.__dict__.

If you want the attribute to be customizable on a per-instance basis, use an instance attribute:

class A(object):
   def __init__(self):
       self.foo = None

This causes ('foo',None) to be a (key,value) pair in a.__dict__ where a=A() is an instance of A.

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makes sense, I thought they were bounded to the instance in both cases... thanks :) –  fortran Oct 18 '11 at 15:06
5  
Python has a complicated set of attribute lookup rules. Without getting into descriptors, for this case it suffices to know a.__dict__ is searched for the foo key first, and if it is not found there, then A.__dict__ is searched. This is why you can use a.foo even if foo is a class attribute. –  unutbu Oct 18 '11 at 15:19

Putting object attributes on the class is pointless, and possibly even counterproductive; they're never needed on the class itself, and if the object bound is mutable then it almost never does what you want it to anyways.

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1  
I think I disagree with that. Putting immutable default values (None, tuples, or frozensets, the initial value of int counters, etc) on the class is a very useful. I agree however, that putting mutable objects on the class is something to be very careful with. –  Matt Anderson Oct 18 '11 at 15:35
    
@Matt: You're allowed to disagree, but then the onus is on you to provide reasoning. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 18 '11 at 21:55

Attributes defined in the class definition are considered class variables (like static variables in Java), while those set in the initializer are instance attributes (note the difference between self.something = 1 and something = 1). See this question for more details, and this one for even more. There is not a lot of practical difference between these two cases, as the class-level definition gives the attribute a default value, but if you want to use some kind of logic to set an attribute before using an object instance you should do it in the __init__() method.

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