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I'm working with a table with two columns that are the same key where the rows contain duplicate values but in different columns:

A1 | A2
---+---
b  |  c
c  |  b

Is there a way to reduce this to just one row?


EDIT: Sorry about the ambiguity. I want the output to be either b|c or c|b. If I had a table with more values like:

b|c
c|b
d|e
e|d

I'd want something like:

b|c
d|e
share|improve this question
    
Your question is unclear. Can you please give some example output to go with your example input? –  Jack Maney Oct 18 '11 at 15:29
    
Do you want to detect these "duplicates" so you can delete them, or exclude the c/b combo since b/c has already gone by? –  Marc B Oct 18 '11 at 15:29
1  
It depends... What does A1 and A2 mean? –  Abe Miessler Oct 18 '11 at 15:30
1  
"two columns that are the same key"? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 18 '11 at 15:36

4 Answers 4

I'd do it via an intermediary table. Here is what I would do:

SELECT DISTINCT 
   CASE WHEN A1 >= A2 THEN A1 ELSE A2 END A1
  ,CASE WHEN A1 >= A2 THEN A2 ELSE A1 END A2
INTO
  T2
FROM
  T1

DROP TABLE T1
SELECT * INTO T1 FROM T2
DROP TABLE T2
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1  
With PostgreSQL, Oracle or MySQL, you could replace the CASE expression with LEAST and GREATEST. –  Vincent Savard Oct 18 '11 at 15:36
1  
The tag only said SQL, though a good one to note for the future. –  briantyler Oct 18 '11 at 15:39
    
No need for an intermediate table. –  a_horse_with_no_name Oct 18 '11 at 15:41
    
@a_horse_with_no_name: Can you show me a simple solution without one that uses standard SQL then? Your "solution" below doesn't remove the duplicates in the table (and since there is only one source table you are just demonstrating a very expensive way of doing a SELECT DISTINCT on table1) –  briantyler Oct 18 '11 at 16:01
    
Oops, I didn't realize it was only one table. But I don't see an requirement to actually delete the rows from that table. –  a_horse_with_no_name Oct 18 '11 at 16:02

Assuming those values can be sorted correctly:

SELECT DISTINCT least(a1), greatest(a2)
FROM table1

If the values in a1 and a2 cannot be sorted properly, this won't work though.

share|improve this answer
SELECT A1, A2
  FROM YourTable
 WHERE A1 < A2
UNION
SELECT A2 AS A1, A1 AS A2
  FROM YourTable
 WHERE A1 > A2;

Once you have fixes the data, add a constraint e.g.

CHECK (A1 < A2);
share|improve this answer
select distinct A1 from Table1
union
select distinct A2 from Table1
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't that be two rows? The question isn't very clear, but he does say he wasn't to reduce it to one row. –  Abe Miessler Oct 18 '11 at 15:32
    
-1: Sorry, missed the point. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 18 '11 at 15:37

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