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I'm trying to do this query (in oracle) but I have some problems:

SELECT CASE 
         WHEN deptno = '10' THEN scott.seq.nextval 
                                  || 'next10' 
         WHEN deptno = '20' THEN scott.seqnextval 
                                  || 'next20' 
         WHEN deptno = '30' THEN scott.seq.currval 
                                  || 'curr' 
       END col_1 
FROM   scott.emp; 

I'm getting this results:

COL_1
----------------------------------------------
191next20
192curr
193curr
194next20
195curr
196curr
197next10
198next20
199next10
200curr
201next20
202curr
203next20
204next10
205next20
206next10
207next10

And this is what I think they should be:

COL_1
----------------------------------------------
191next20
192curr
193curr
194next20
194curr
194curr
197next10
198next20
199next10
199curr
201next20
201curr
203next20
204next10
205next20
206next10
207next10

So, why i get the next value of the sequence also when I should have the current value and not only when the case selects the next value? Yeah, this could be done with a plsql script but I can't.

Thanks you!

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2  
Why do you use a sequence for this? What is it that you are really trying to achieve? –  a_horse_with_no_name Oct 18 '11 at 16:02
    
It is a sort of exercise, I need this for an ODI interface. –  Bolla Oct 18 '11 at 17:02
2  
@Bolla - It sounds like you want to be using an analytic function to compute the numeric portion of your result, not a sequence. But I'm having problems trying to understand the logic you're trying to implement particularly since there is no ORDER BY in your query so the order in which DEPTNO 30 rows are returned is indeterminant. –  Justin Cave Oct 18 '11 at 18:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Interesting. Per the Oracle docs:

The statements in a WHEN clause can modify the database and call non-deterministic functions. There is no fall-through mechanism as in the C switch statement

Notice it doesn't say the statements in the "true" WHEN clause. So even if the when statement is false, the nextval will fire:

select
case when 1=0 then 'next ' || seq_id.nextval
     when 1=1 then 'curr ' || seq_id.currval
end col1
from dual;

I must admit this is different than I expected.

EDIT: See answer from ShannonSeverance

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1  
1) The docs are not saying that the DB will willy nilly execute statements on the THEN side of a CASE clause. 2) The docs you reference are for CASE statement, not the CASE expression. OP's example is using the CASE expression. The expression is documented at: download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e26088/…. –  Shannon Severance Oct 18 '11 at 16:59
    
@ShannonSeverance see my edit/comments –  tbone Oct 18 '11 at 17:43
1  
Are you claiming that saying that, "The statements in a WHEN clause can modify the database and call non-deterministic functions" means that case when false then insert into t values (1); else null; end case; may end up inserting a new row into t? –  Shannon Severance Oct 18 '11 at 18:24
    
@tbone: You are referencing an irrelevant part of the docs (CASE statement vs CASE clause) and you are interpreting even that (unrelated part) wrongly. A function that modifies the database can modify the database only if it is called. Even more nextval and currval are not functions. –  ypercube Oct 18 '11 at 18:45

Nextval and currval are not functions, but are "Sequence Pseudocolumns".

"Within a single SQL statement containing a reference to NEXTVAL, Oracle increments the sequence once: For each row returned by the outer query block of a SELECT statement. Such a query block can appear in the following places. ..." (emphasis added) [Oracle Database SQL Language Reference, "How to Use Sequence Values"]

In other words, seq.nextval is not a function with a side affect, but a pseudocolumn that has a particular value per row. Once there is a single reference to seq.nextval, the value increments for every row, whether or not the value is used. The outcome OP is seeing is a peculiar to sequences, not case expressions. For example, same thing with decode:

SQL> select decode(deptno
  2         , 10, seq.nextval || 'next10'
  3         , 20, seq.nextval || 'next20'
  4         , 30, seq.currval || 'curr30')
  5  from emp;

DECODE(DEPTNO,10,SEQ.NEXTVAL||'NEXT10',20,SEQ.
----------------------------------------------
35next20
36curr30
37curr30
38next20
39curr30
40curr30
41next10
42next20
43next10
44curr30
45next20
46curr30
47next20
48next10
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A good day, I learned something new ;) I upvoted this, cannot remove my answer. –  tbone Oct 18 '11 at 19:35

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