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I need to grep full stacktrace from logfile by keyword.

This code works fine, but to slow on big files (more than file the slower). I think the best way to improve regex to find keyword, but I could not get it done.


#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $regexp;
my $stacktrace;
undef $/;

$regexp = shift;
$regexp = quotemeta($regexp);

while (<>) {
  while ( $_ =~ /(?<LEVEL>^[E|W|D|I])\s
                 (?<TIMESTAMP>\d{6}\s\d{6}\.\d{3})\s
                 (?<THREAD>.*?)\/
                 (?<CLASS>.*?)\s-\s
                 (?<MESSAGE>.*?[\r|\n](?=^[[E|W|D|I]\s\d{6}\s\d{6}\.\d{3}]?))/gsmx ) {
    $stacktrace = $&;
    if ( $+{MESSAGE} =~ /$regexp/ ) {
      print "$stacktrace";
    }
  }
}

Usage: ./grep_log4j.pl <pattern> <file>

Example: ./grep_log4j.pl Exception sample.log

I think problem in $stacktrace = $&; because if remove this string and simply print the all matching lines script works fast. Version of script to print all matches:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

undef $/;

while (<>) {
  while ( $_ =~ /(?<LEVEL>^[E|W|D|I])\s
                 (?<TIMESTAMP>\d{6}\s\d{6}\.\d{3})\s
                 (?<THREAD>.*?)\/
                 (?<CLASS>.*?)\s-\s
                 (?<MESSAGE>.*?[\r|\n](?=^[[E|W|D|I]\s\d{6}\s\d{6}\.\d{3}]?))/gsmx ) {
    print_result();
  }
}

sub print_result {
    print "LEVEL: $+{LEVEL}\n";
    print "TIMESTAMP: $+{TIMESTAMP}\n";
    print "THREAD: $+{THREAD}\n";
    print "CLASS: $+{CLASS}\n";
    print "MESSAGE: $+{MESSAGE}\n";
}

Usage: ./grep_log4j.pl <file>

Example: ./grep_log4j.pl sample.log

Lo4j pattern: %-1p %d %t/%c{1} - %m%n

Example of logfile:

I 111012 141506.000 thread/class - Received message: something
E 111012 141606.000 thread/class - Failed handling mobile request
java.lang.NullPointerException
  at javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet.service(HttpServlet.java:710)
  at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:619)
W 111012 141706.000 thread/class - Received message: something
E 111012 141806.000 thread/class - Failed with Exception
java.lang.NullPointerException
  at javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet.service(HttpServlet.java:710)
  at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:619)
D 111012 141906.000 thread/class - Received message: something
S 111012 142006.000 thread/class - Received message: something
I 111012 142106.000 thread/class - Received message: something
I 111013 142206.000 thread/class - Metrics:0/1

My regex you can find on http://gskinner.com/RegExr/ by log4j keyword:

share|improve this question
1  
In general you should avoid using $& - see the WARNING in perldoc perlre. Using it in your programs does incur a speed penalty. –  user5402 Oct 18 '11 at 17:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are using:

$/ = undef;

This makes perl read the entire file into memory.

I would process this file line-by-line like this (assuming the stack trace is associated with the message above the trace):

my $matched;
while (<>) {
  if (m/^(?<LEVEL>\S+) \s+ (?<TIMESTAMP>(\d+) \s+ ([\d.])+) \s+ (?<THREADCLASS>\S+) \s+ - \s+ (?<REST>.*)/x) {
    my %captures = %+;
    $matched = ($+{REST} =~ $regexp);
    if ($matched) {
      print "LEVEL: $captures{LEVEL}\n";
      ...
    }
  } elsif ($matched) {
    print;
  }
}

Here is a general technique for parsing multi-line blocks. The following loop reads STDIN one line at a time and feeds complete blocks of the log file to the subroutine process:

my $first;
my $stack = "";
while (<STDIN>) {
  if (m/^\S /) {
    process($first, $stack) if $first;
    $first = $_;
    $stack = "";
  } else {
    $stack .= $_;
  }
}
process($first, $stack) if $first;

sub process {
  my ($first, $stack) = @_;
  # ... do whatever you want here ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I know if i am using $/ = undef; i read file into memory and that not scary me :) Otherwise if read file line-by-line how i can find match by keyword on second line and more? –  Gofrolist Oct 19 '11 at 9:34
    
For example: i need to find all stacktrace in logfile by keyword java.lang.Thread.run. And second remark: in your example of code first if match the string and use named group, but the next line if true you use one more regexp $matched = ($+{REST} =~ $regexp); and this string rewrite all previous named group. Because of this i am use $stacktrace = $&; in my first example of code. –  Gofrolist Oct 19 '11 at 9:49
    
Good catch about overwriting %+ - I'll fix the example. –  user5402 Oct 19 '11 at 15:11
    
A added an example of a another general approach to parsing multi-line blocks. –  user5402 Oct 19 '11 at 15:26
    
Thanks user5402. The both of this examples are working and the second example with line-by-line faster than 5 times! –  Gofrolist Oct 20 '11 at 8:51

The problem is in misusing [] in your regexp.

[...] is for defining character classes

(...) is for grouping

All you need is to change [E|W|D|I] to [EWDI] everywhere and not use [] for grouping in MESSAGE.

Here's final code that works for me:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

undef $/;

while (<>) {
    while (
        $_ =~ /(?<LEVEL>^[EWDIS])\s
                 (?<TIMESTAMP>\d{6}\s\d{6}\.\d{3})\s
                 (?<THREAD>.*?)\/
                 (?<CLASS>.*?)\s-\s
                 (?<MESSAGE>.*?[\r\n](?=[EWDIS]\s\d{6}\s\d{6}\.\d{3}|$))/gmxs
      )
    {
        print_result();
    }
}

sub print_result {
    print "LEVEL: $+{LEVEL}\n";
    print "TIMESTAMP: $+{TIMESTAMP}\n";
    print "THREAD: $+{THREAD}\n";
    print "CLASS: $+{CLASS}\n";
    print "MESSAGE: $+{MESSAGE}\n";
}

Note, that in flag list you missed 'S' letter.

This example also may contains errors, but it works in general.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for correcting my regexp. But my problem is not here. This example of code print all log message, but the next step of this i need to find every log message that contains my keyword. For example: print two log message from sampple log file that contains java.lang.Thread.run. –  Gofrolist Oct 19 '11 at 9:54
    
You can achieve this in two ways: 1. in while () loop check $+{MESSAGE} to contain desired string. Since you are using /g that wont cost you much 2. change <MESSAGE>.* to <MESSAGE>[^\n]*?java\.lang.Thread.run. Should work too. Also, I'd split that too-big-and-difficult regexp into two parts: Everything before <MESSAGE> and <MESSAGE> itself and use it consecutively. –  yko Oct 19 '11 at 11:34

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