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I cannot figure out why my code is breaking, and I could use some help.

First of all, the code:

Timer.h:

#include [...]

class Timer {
    public:
        [...]
        Timer operator+(double);
        [...]
    private:
        [...]
        void correctthedate(int day, int month, int year);
        [...]
};

Timer.cc:

#include "Timer.h"
using namespace std;

[...]

void correctthedate(int day, int month, int year) {
    [...]
}

[...]

Timer Timer::operator+(double plush) {
    [...]
    correctthedate(curday, curmonth, curyear);
    return *this;
}

When I try to compile I get the error:

Timer.o: In function `Timer::operator+(double)':
Timer.cc:(.text+0x1ad3): undefined reference to `Timer::correctthedate(int, int, int)'

Any pointers in the right direction? Thanks!

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Time / Timer? You have a mix here. –  crashmstr Oct 18 '11 at 17:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The following line:

void correctthedate(int day, int month, int year) {

should read

void Timer::correctthedate(int day, int month, int year) {

Otherwise you're just defining an unrelated function called correctthedate().

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Awesome! Thanks much! –  InBetween Oct 18 '11 at 17:10
1  
Anybody who's ever made this mistake before, raise your hands: !_! –  Mark Ransom Oct 18 '11 at 17:17

Write

void Timer::correctthedate(int day, int month, int year) {

Your correctthedate definition is a free function, albeit one without a prototype. You have to qualify the name with Timer::

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Replace this:

void correctthedate(int day, int month, int year) {

With this:

Timer::correctthedate(int day, int month, int year) {

In your version, correctthedate is just an ordinary function, it just so happens that it has the same name as one of the methods of Time. Time::correctthedate is a completely different function (method) which doesn't have a definition, so the linker complains it can't find it.

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Your header declares a Timer::operator+ and a Timer::correctthedate function.
Your cpp defines a Timer::operator+ and a ::correcttehdate function.
The linker can't find Timer::correctthedate.

The answer is to change void correctthedate(int... to void Timer::correctthedate(int....

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