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There is a php class in which I like to change the variable, but I can't make it happen. The Class:

class ShopCart 
{
    private $maincurrency = 'USD';

    private function set_Currency() {
        $maincurrency = 'GBP';
        return $maincurrency;
    }
}

This doesn't work. Even if I make it public. What am I doing wrong?

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Define "doesn't work". – PreferenceBean Oct 18 '11 at 17:27
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to use $this->maincurrency in the body of your method. Your current code creates and sets local variable, not a member.

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Agreed, $maincurrency is a class variable. +1. – swatkins Oct 18 '11 at 17:29
    
Thank you got it now – Rob Oct 18 '11 at 17:38

You need $this:

class ShopCart {
   private $maincurrency = 'USD';

   private function set_Currency() {
       $this->$maincurrency = 'GBP';
       return $this->$maincurrency;
   }
}

Otherwise you're creating a new variable local to the function and just using that.

The manual does actually tell you this already:

Within class methods the properties, constants, and methods may be accessed by using the form $this->property (where property is the name of the property) unless the access is to a static property within the context of a static class method, in which case it is accessed using the form self::$property.

The documentation is your friend; consult it before asking here please.


You may also want to consider not returning anything from a setter, though that's up to you. There are advantages to doing so, even if it's not all that conventional in PHP.

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class ShopCart {
    private $maincurrency = 'USD';

    private function setCurrency() {
        $this->maincurrency = 'GBP';
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
You should not return because set logic suppose that you just set some variable value, not output or return it – user973254 Oct 18 '11 at 17:29
    
On the contrary, this approach allows chaining. It's also what = does in most (all?) C-style languages. – PreferenceBean Oct 18 '11 at 17:31
    
and watch on method name that I've changed, you should use CamelCase only, but do not mix. – user973254 Oct 18 '11 at 17:31

change $maincurrency = 'GBP'; to $this->maincurrency = 'GBP';, and also return $this->maincurrency;

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