Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given the data structure as follows, as you can see each record inside one file has the same values for ATT1 and ATT2.

// Store in fileD001.txt
ATT1 | ATT2     | ATT3  | ATT4 ...  | ATT200
D001 | 10102011 | x13   | x14   ... | x1200
D001 | 10102011 | x23   | x24   ... | x2200
...
D001 | 10102011 | xN3   | xN4   ... | xN200

// Store in fileD002.txt
ATT1 | ATT2     | ATT3  | ATT4 ...  | ATT200
D002 | 10112011 | x13   | x14   ... | x1200
D002 | 10112011 | x23   | x24   ... | x2200
...
D002 | 10112011 | xN3   | xN4   ... | xN200

// Store in fileD003.txt
ATT1 | ATT2     | ATT3  | ATT4 ...  | ATT200
D003 | 10132011 | x13   | x14   ... | x1200
D003 | 10132011 | x23   | x24   ... | x2200
...
D003 | 10132011 | xN3   | xN4   ... | xN200


Method One: Assume I use the following structure to store the data.
doc = { “ATT1"    : "D001",
        "ATT2"    : "10102011",
        "ATT3"   : "x13",
        "ATT4"   : "x14",
        ...
        "ATT200" : "x1200"            
      }

Here is the problem, the data contains too much duplicated information and waste the space of DB. However, the benefit is that each record has its own _id.

Method One: Assume I use the following structure to store the data.
doc = { “ATT1"    : "D001",
        "ATT2"    : "10102011",
        "sub_doc" : { "ATT3"   : "x13",
                      "ATT4"   : "x14",
                      ...
                      "ATT200" : "x1200"
                    }
      }

Here is the problem, the data size N, which is around 1~5000, is too much and cannot be handled by MongoDB in one insertion operation. Of course, we can use $push update modifier to gradually append the data. However, each record has no _id any more in this way.

I don't mean each record has to have its own ID. I am just looking for a better design solution for the task like this.

Thank you

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Option 1 is decent since it gives you the easiest data to work with. Maybe worry less about the space since it is cheap?

Option 2 is good to conserve space, though watch out that your document does not get too large. Maximum document size may limit you. Also, if you shard in the future this could limit you.

Option 3 is being a little relational about it. Have two collections. The first one is just a lookup for ATT1 and ATT2 pairs. The other collection is a reference to the other and the final atts.

parent = { att1: "val1", att2: "val2"}

child = {parent: parent.id, att3: "val3"...}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.