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In a project I am running I need to compile this code into a DLL:

// svgzHandler.cs 
using System; 
using System.Web;
namespace svgzHandler
{
    public class svgzHandler : IHttpHandler
    {
        #region IHttpHandler メンバー
        public bool IsReusable { get { return true; } }
        public void ProcessRequest(HttpContext context)
        {
            HttpResponse r = context.Response;
            r.ContentType = "image/svg+xml";
            r.AppendHeader("Content-Encoding", "gzip");
            r.WriteFile(context.Request.PhysicalPath);
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

Only I am no programmer and have NO IDEA WHAT THIS ALL MEANS. Also, what should the japanese characters be replaced by? is it a folder? a file?

I have Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate so I do have the compiler but This is the first bit of C# code i've ever touched.

thank you for your help!

P.S: I don't know if this will help but this is the site with the instructions (translated from japanese): http://www.microsofttranslator.com/bv.aspx?ref=Internal&from=&to=en&a=http://blog.wonderrabbitproject.net/post/2009/06/13/svgze381aee3838fe383b3e38388e383a9e38292IIS75e381a6.aspx

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Here is an actual translation: translate.google.co.uk/translate?hl=en&sl=ja&u=http://… –  niemiro Oct 18 '11 at 17:59
    
WonderRabbitProject is not this mackerel have Internet service with content editing rehearsal. –  bzlm Oct 18 '11 at 18:00
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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The Japanese characters are inside a section name which is ignored by the compiler. You could completely get rid of the lines #region and #endregion if they bother you. It's a Visual Studio thing to organize code, the compiler doesn't use them. So to compile to an assembly, simply create a new project in visual studio of type Class Library and add this class to it. You will have to reference the System.Web assembly in order to successfully compile as the IHttpHandler interface that is used in this code is defined there.

So the actual code could be simply (svgzHandler.cs):

namespace svgzHandler 
{
    using System; 
    using System.Web; 

    public class svgzHandler : IHttpHandler
    {
        public bool IsReusable { get { return true; } }

        public void ProcessRequest(HttpContext context)
        {
            HttpResponse r = context.Response;
            r.ContentType = "image/svg+xml";
            r.AppendHeader("Content-Encoding", "gzip");
            r.WriteFile(context.Request.PhysicalPath);
        }
    } 
}

And by the way you don't even need Visual Studio in order to compile. You could directly use a C# compiler:

c:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\csc.exe /target:library svgzHandler.cs

which would spit a svgzHandler.dll assembly.

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OH MY GOD I JUST GENERATED MY FIRST DLL EVAR <3 I love you! :D –  SnippetSpace Oct 18 '11 at 18:08
    
3 years later, and it's still useful!! Thanks Darin!! –  Rogala Jun 30 at 15:45
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It's pretty easy to do, just create a class library and then publish. A set of instructions is outlined HERE

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Create a Class Library project, put the code there, fix namespaces, build and voilá!

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  1. Create a new Class Library project (File -> New Project -> Class Library)
  2. Add a reference to System.Web (right click "References" in solution explorere, go to .NET tab, select System.Web)
  3. Replace the code in the default class1.cs file with your code there, just cut and paste and don't worry about the foreign characters, they're just in a region statement that the compiler doesn't care about
  4. Build (select build menu option then build solution)

Your dll will be in the bin/debug directory of the project

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