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I have the following situation:

In order to run a algorithm, i must run several threads and each thread will set a instance variable x, right before it dies. The problem is that these threads dont return immediately:

public Foo myAlgorithm()
{
    //create n Runnables (n is big)
    //start these runnables (may take long time do die)

    //i need the x value of each runnable here, but they havent finished yet!

    //get average x from all the runnables

    return new Foo(averageX);
}

Should i use wait notify ? Or should i just embed a while loop and check for termination ?

Thanks everyone!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Create some shared storage to hold the x value from each thread, or just store the sum if that's sufficient. Use a CountDownLatch to wait for the threads to terminate. Each thread, when finished, would call CountDownLatch.countDown() and your myAlgorithm method would use the CountDownLatch.await() method to wait for them.

Edit: Here's a complete example of the approach I suggested. It created 39 worker threads, each of which adds a random number to a shared sum. When all of the workers are finished, the average is computed and printed.

import java.util.Random;
import java.util.concurrent.CountDownLatch;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger;

class Worker implements Runnable {

    private final AtomicInteger sum;
    private final CountDownLatch latch;

    public Worker(AtomicInteger sum, CountDownLatch latch) {
        this.sum = sum;
        this.latch = latch;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        Random random = new Random();

        try {
            // Sleep a random length of time from 5-10s
            Thread.sleep(random.nextInt(5000) + 5000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        // Compute x
        int x = random.nextInt(500);

        // Add to the shared sum
        System.out.println("Adding " + x + " to sum");
        sum.addAndGet(x);

        // This runnable is finished, so count down
        latch.countDown();
    }
}

class Program {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // There will be 39 workers
        final int N = 39;

        // Holds the sum of all results from all workers
        AtomicInteger sum = new AtomicInteger();
        // Tracks how many workers are still working
        CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(N);

        System.out.println("Starting " + N + " workers");

        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
            // Each worker uses the shared atomic sum and countdown latch.
            Worker worker = new Worker(sum, latch);

            // Start the worker
            new Thread(worker).start();
        }

        try {
            // Important: waits for all workers to finish.
            latch.await();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        // Compute the average
        double average = (double) sum.get() / (double) N;

        System.out.println("    Sum: " + sum.get());
        System.out.println("Workers: " + N);
        System.out.println("Average: " + average);
    }

}

The output should be something like this:

Starting 39 workers
Adding 94 to sum
Adding 86 to sum
Adding 454 to sum
...
...
...
Adding 358 to sum
Adding 134 to sum
Adding 482 to sum
    Sum: 10133
Workers: 39
Average: 259.8205128205128

Edit: Just for fun, here is an example using ExecutorService, Callable, and Future.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collection;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Random;
import java.util.concurrent.Callable;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Future;
import java.util.concurrent.ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor;

class Worker implements Callable<Integer> {

    @Override
    public Integer call() throws Exception {
        Random random = new Random();

        // Sleep a random length of time, from 5-10s
        Thread.sleep(random.nextInt(5000) + 5000);

        // Compute x
        int x = random.nextInt(500);
        System.out.println("Computed " + x);

        return x;
    }

}

public class Program {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // Thread pool size
        final int POOL_SIZE = 10;

        // There will be 39 workers
        final int N = 39;

        System.out.println("Starting " + N + " workers");

        // Create the workers
        Collection<Callable<Integer>> workers = new ArrayList<Callable<Integer>>(N);

        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
            workers.add(new Worker());
        }

        // Create the executor service
        ExecutorService executor = new ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor(POOL_SIZE);

        // Execute all the workers, wait for the results
        List<Future<Integer>> results = null;

        try {
            // Executes all tasks and waits for them to finish
            results = executor.invokeAll(workers);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return;
        }

        // Compute the sum from the results
        int sum = 0;

        for (Future<Integer> future : results) {
            try {
                sum += future.get();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace(); return;
            } catch (ExecutionException e) {
                e.printStackTrace(); return;
            }
        }

        // Compute the average
        double average = (double) sum / (double) N;

        System.out.println("         Sum: " + sum);
        System.out.println("     Workers: " + N);
        System.out.println("     Average: " + average);
    }

}

The output should look like this:

Starting 39 workers
Computed 419
Computed 36
Computed 338
...
...
...
Computed 261
Computed 354
Computed 112
         Sum: 9526
     Workers: 39
     Average: 244.25641025641025
share|improve this answer
    
Amazing! I'll be saving this for reference. Im coding a Genetic algorithm to play Tetris, all the agents must finish their games in order to mate with each other, so the population can evolve. Each game will run in a different thread, thanks for your time, this java.util.concurrent API is a life saver! –  Fernando Oct 18 '11 at 21:52
    
Just one more question: Which way seems to be faster, CountDownLatch or the ThreadedPool ?Or there's no difference at all? Thanks! –  Fernando Oct 18 '11 at 22:03
    
In the examples I provided, the CountDownLatch is faster. The reason is that in the CountDownLatch example, all of the threads were spawned at once. In the ExecutorService example, a maximum of 10 threads could be running at once, because that was the POOL_SIZE that I chose. If you set POOL_SIZE to 39 in the ExecutorService example, the results should be almost identical to the CountDownLatch example. –  William Brendel Oct 20 '11 at 5:32

You may make yourself known to java.util.concurrent.Future and all the associated stuff like ThreadPools, Executors etc. Teaser: A Future is a thread with a return value.

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A CountDownLatch initialized to N can be used to make one thread wait until N threads have completed some action, or some action has been completed N times. Thats exactly what i need! Thank you guys! –  Fernando Oct 18 '11 at 18:26

use a ExecutorService and submit each task (as a Callable) to it

you'll get a Future for each task submitted

List<Future<ResultType>> results = exec.invokeAll(tasks);//tasks is a set of Callable<ResultType>
//invokeAll blocks untill all tasks are finished
for(Future<ResultType> f:results){
    ResultType x=f.get();//loop over Futures to get the result
    //do something with x
}
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Hum that looks simpler than the CountDownLatch stuff. Looking forward this, thanks! –  Fernando Oct 18 '11 at 18:40

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