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I am planning to build a class that helps me keep track of the allocated/released memory in any Objective-C/iOS program I develop. Ideally it would help me catch memory leaks. The idea is that every class I create, inherits from my memory managment (MemWatch) object that inherits from NSObject. The schema would be something like this:

a little diragram,

The idea is that the class MemWatch intercepts any alloc method messaging and keeps track of the alloc and release calls in some reference counting fashion. And when the object gets deallocated, the MemWatch class would just check if the number of allocated variables is equal to 0.

The code i've written goes something like this: MemWatch.h

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

extern int cantObjects;
@interface MemWatch : NSObject {
}

@end

MemWatch.m

#import "MemWatch.h"

int cantObjects;
@implementation MemWatch

+ (id)alloc{    
    cantObjects++;
    return [super alloc];;
}

- (oneway void)release{
    [super release];
    cantObjects--;
}

- (void)dealloc{
    [super dealloc];

    if(cantObjects!=0)
        NSLog(@"Memory leaks found! Exactly %d found..", cantObjects);

    NSAssert(cantObjects==0, @"Memory leaks found! Exactly %d found..", cantObjects);
}

@end

This code is not working as expected. The problem is that I can't keep track of the number of allocated variables within each class that allocates them. I've created a global variable:

extern int cantObjects;

that gets updated from any class that inherits from MemWatch. I've of course tried to keep track of the allocations as a member variable of the class, but that doesn't seem to work. Any ideas? Anybody knows of some code that does this or something like this? Couldn't find anything in the forum.

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5  
Why not just use the built-in stuff for doing this, like the Instruments app? –  Dave DeLong Oct 18 '11 at 18:15
2  
This will get really annoying when you want to subclass stock Apple classes... –  esqew Oct 18 '11 at 18:19
    
Sounds like a really interesting project, but I think you're re-inventing the wheel here... –  MarkGranoff Oct 18 '11 at 18:27
    
Hi everyone. Thank you for your comments and suggestions. I know instruments, they are very cool tool. But, they way I see it it helps you find memory leaks that exist in your code. This class I'm trying to create would automatically check for such memory leaks, and prevent the even from existing in the first place. Instruments would always be an additional help. I used to work in a game company, where we had something like this written in C++ which was really really useful for preventing memory bugs. –  Ignacio Oroná Oct 18 '11 at 20:34
    
@IgnacioOroná: for c++ this makes perfect sense because c++ doesn't have garbage collection or reference counting built in (before c++11 at least, which I believe the company predates). but objective c has both garbage collection and reference counting which means you don't have to, and shouldn't, implement your own. –  Dani Oct 18 '11 at 21:17
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2 Answers

You could do something like

extern CustomSingleton *memRegister;
@interface MemWatch : NSObject {

}

@end

+ (id)alloc{    

    //make sure memRegister exists
    id obj = [super alloc];
    [memRegister registerObject:obj];
    return obj;
}

where you register each object in a dictionary with it member's count, but actually I don't think, this might be useful: You cannot use it with any classes provided by apple or 3rd party vendors.

Best Solution: learn to love Instruments.

Yet another solution: a combination of method swizzeling and object extension with setting associated objects, but just do it in debug mode and ONLY (I emphasize ONLY), if you know what you are doing.

Did I mention, that it would be best to stick with Instruments?

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Hi @vikingosegundo good idea, the thing you suggest is the first idea I had, but if you check my code, the alloc method has to be over-written in the following way: + (id)alloc this means that alloc is a static method, so you cannot access any member variables (like cantObjects in this case). I'll check your other suggestions, now! –  Ignacio Oroná Oct 18 '11 at 20:35
    
ah yeah, sure. see my edit for another idea — yet not something I'd consider worthy. –  vikingosegundo Oct 18 '11 at 20:45
    
edit got lost. edited again. –  vikingosegundo Oct 18 '11 at 20:56
    
You know @vikingosegundo in a gaming comany I used to work (where we developed games for NintendoWii, PC, etc) we had this very same thing written in C++ and it proved to be very very useful and straighfoward for finding memory leaks. I would love to have the same thing in Obj-C + Instruments. Let me check your new edit –  Ignacio Oroná Oct 18 '11 at 20:59
    
I believe, it is useful, but as I said: It will be hard to achieve. So if you want to do it, try method swizzeling and Runtime programming. –  vikingosegundo Oct 18 '11 at 21:02
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You have only single inheritance with objc - this will not extend well.

A proper implementation would also be very slow (given a nontrivial number of objects).

Your program has some bugs:

+ (id)alloc{    
    cantObjects++; // << not threadsafe
    return [super alloc];
}

- (oneway void)release{
    [super release];
    cantObjects--; // << this is a ref count operation, not a dealloc operation
}

- (void)dealloc{
    [super dealloc];

    if(cantObjects!=0) // << this means you want no more than one MemWatch instance at any given time
        NSLog(@"Memory leaks found! Exactly %d found..", cantObjects);

    NSAssert(cantObjects==0, @"Memory leaks found! Exactly %d found..", cantObjects);
}

and it is not an effective approach to diagnose leaks.

If you want to do this, C++ would be capable, but a good implementation would be complex, if you are to cover all your cases. If you are really inclined, there is nothing C++ can't do that objc can do, so a C++ implementation would be the route to take.

For ObjC: There are existing tools for this, and the diagnostics are relatively good. If you want to test specific cases, then it would be easier to go the C++ route and add these little checkers to your objc types. Again, that is a somewhat complex implementation get right, assuming you cover all your cases (and make it thread safe).

It would take the basic form:

class t_memcheck {
public:
  t_memcheck() { register here }
  ~t_memcheck() { unregister here }
};


@interface MONType : NSObject
{
@private
  t_memcheck memcheck;
}
@end

That solves the inheritance problem, but it would still be slow for nontrivial object counts if you were to make it thread safe.

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There are certainly some things that C++ can't do that Objective-C can, no? How about method swizzling? Last I checked, C++ vtables sections in Mach-O, ELF, et al. were marked read-only and attempting to rewrite those values would cause a protection fault. This could be circumvented with some compiler trickery, but that is a path fraught with peril. –  Sedate Alien Oct 18 '11 at 22:31
    
@SedateAlien no, that behavior is really not tough to reproduce. method swizzling is accomplished via the objc runtime. using c++ to implement portions of the runtime is not so difficult. such an implementation could easily produce a dynamically populated/mutable dispatch table. a c++ implementation could be as efficient as objc's. –  justin Oct 18 '11 at 22:49
    
Your assertion is that because Obj-c's runtime can be reimplemented in C++ that means C++ can do everything Obj-C can do? Of course that is the case, I could reimplement any Turing-complete language in any other language, it doesn't mean the idea isn't ridiculous. –  Sedate Alien Oct 18 '11 at 23:55
    
@SedateAlien Would you be level headed about this? It's just an abstraction layer; Arrays of function pointers are not unique to Objective-C. If abstraction layers are ridiculous in this industry... –  justin Oct 19 '11 at 4:40
    
I am being level-headed about this? My apologies if I am being misunderstood. I genuinely don't understand why you would reimplement the Obj-C runtime and what advantages that would entail w.r.t to the OP's question? (That said, this is orthogonal to the point I raised in my original comment, but we'll leave that for now as it's not relevant to the thread) –  Sedate Alien Oct 19 '11 at 5:11
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