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I am just getting started with some Jackson JSON data here. This section is giving me trouble.

"pointData":{
    "1":"32.1093904, 66.7065216", 
    "2":"33.1236854, 67.8128443", 
    "3":"32.9524550, 67.0013501"
}

It seems to me that having integers as the attribute name is illegal. Is this correct?

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1  
Jonathan M provided an excellent answer, but I wonder - if you have these numeric attributes, why not use an Array? point[1], point[2] etc. where each array element is an object { "x": 32.1093904, "y": 66.7065216} –  Stephen P Oct 18 '11 at 18:58
    
As pointed out, it is perfectly fine (from JSON perspective) to use Strings that are all numeric. But beyond invalid JSON (missing curlies around your object), are you having other problems? –  StaxMan Oct 19 '11 at 15:45
    
My full JSON data was actually formatted correctly, and this was just a snippet and I forgot the braces. The main problem that I had was traced to a different part of the code, which I am working out now. However, the answers given already have some important info that has helped me out. Thanks. –  NeilMonday Oct 19 '11 at 17:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're correct that JSON cannot have integer attribute names, because all JSON attribute names must be quoted as yours are above, making them strings. See the flow here: http://json.org/

Also, your JSON structure above is invalid because it begins with an attribute name, but no object that the attribute is a part of. If you're getting errors, this is why. A legal structure would be:

{"pointData":{
    "1":"32.1093904, 66.7065216", 
    "2":"33.1236854, 67.8128443", 
    "3":"32.9524550, 67.0013501"
    }
}

FYI, if you're storing point data, a perhaps better structure would be:

{"pointData":{
    "1": {"x": 32.1093904, "y": 66.7065216}, 
    "2": {"x": 33.1236854, "y": 67.8128443}, 
    "3": {"x": 32.9524550, "y": 67.0013501}
    }
}

Notice two things about this structure:

  1. Each point has an x and y property that are independently accessible.
  2. The values of the x and y properties are numeric, not strings.
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Those are not integers, those are strings. They happen to be strings containing characters also used to represent integers in other contexts, but they are strings nonetheless and so this is valid JSON. From the JSON spec:

A string is a sequence of zero or more Unicode characters, wrapped in double quotes, using backslash escapes.

Something like this would not be valid JSON:

{ 1:"32.1093904, 66.7065216", 
  2:"33.1236854, 67.8128443", 
}

...because here the characters are not wrapped in double quotes, and so not valid keys in JSON.

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