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When a user clicks a certain link I would like to present them with a confirmation dialog. If they click "Yes" I would like to continue the original navigation. One catch: my confirmation dialog is implemented by returning a jQuery.Deferred object which is resolved only when/if the user clicks the Yes button. So basically the confirmation dialog is asynchronous.

So basically I want something like this:

$('a.my-link').click(function(e) {
  e.preventDefault(); e.stopPropogation();
  MyApp.confirm("Are you sure you want to navigate away?")
    .done(function() {
      //continue propogation of e
    })
})

Of course I could set a flag and re-trigger click but that is messy as heck. Any natural way of doing this?

share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried $this.trigger(e); (edit that would need a flag if it worked) or $this.parent().trigger(e) (in the callback), where $this refers to the clicked elements? –  Felix Kling Oct 18 '11 at 18:33
    
@FelixKling That won't work because e.preventDefault(); e.stopPropogation(); has sent flags on e. If there was some way to take a copy of e to e2 then I could call something along the lines of e.handler(e2) which I think would work. –  George Mauer Oct 18 '11 at 18:36
    
Well, I thought maybe jQuery is smart enough and resets the flags when it is passed to trigger... –  Felix Kling Oct 18 '11 at 18:37
    
@FelixKling good call, but I just checked the code - no such luck. –  George Mauer Oct 18 '11 at 18:45
1  
@FelixKling: Thanks, but if the original event object isn't needed then .parent().click() would be by far the simplest. –  user113716 Oct 18 '11 at 20:25

5 Answers 5

Below are the bits from the code that actually worked in Chrome 13, to my surprise.

function handler (evt ) {
    var t = evt.target;
    ...
    setTimeout( function() {
        t.dispatchEvent( evt )
    }, 1000);
    return false;
}

This is not very cross-browser, and maybe will be fixed in future, because it feels like security risk, imho.

And i don't know what happens, if you cancel event propagation.

share|improve this answer
    
Well return false should call e.stopPropogation() - but that might be a browser implementation –  George Mauer Oct 20 '11 at 18:28

If I am understanding the problem correctly, I think you can just update the event to be the original event in that closure you have there. So just set e = e.originalEvent in the .done function.

https://jsfiddle.net/oyetxu54/

MyApp.confirm("confirmation?")
.done(function(){ e = e.originalEvent;})

here is a fiddle with a different example (keep the console open so you can see the messages): this worked for me in chrome and firefox

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I solved problem by this way on one of my projects. This example works with some basic event handling like clicks etc. Handler for confirmation must be first handler bound.

    // This example assumes clickFunction is first event handled.
    //
    // you have to preserve called function handler to ignore it 
    // when you continue calling.
    //
    // store it in object to preserve function reference     
    var ignoredHandler = {
        fn: false
    };

    // function which will continues processing        
    var go = function(e, el){
        // process href
        var href = $(el).attr('href');
        if (href) {
             window.location = href;
        }

        // process events
        var events = $(el).data('events');

        for (prop in events) {
            if (events.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
                var event = events[prop];
                $.each(event, function(idx, handler){
                    // do not run for clickFunction
                    if (ignoredHandler.fn != handler.handler) {
                        handler.handler.call(el, e);
                    }
                });
            }
        }
    }

    // click handler
    var clickFunction = function(e){
        e.preventDefault();
        e.stopImmediatePropagation();
        MyApp.confirm("Are you sure you want to navigate away?")
           .done(go.apply(this, e));
    };

    // preserve ignored handler
    ignoredHandler.fn = clickFunction;
    $('.confirmable').click(clickFunction);

    // a little bit longer but it works :)
share|improve this answer
    
For the record, in more recent versions of jquery $(el).data('events') has been removed. There is an unofficial and unsupported way to get events by doing $._data(el, 'events') note that el must be a DOM object and not jquery –  George Mauer Dec 18 '13 at 15:19

I solved this by:

  1. placing a event listener on a parent element
  2. removing the class from the link ONLY when the user confirms
  3. reclicking the link after I have removed the class.

function async() {
  var dfd = $.Deferred();
  
  // simulate async
  setTimeout(function () {
    if (confirm('Stackoverflow FTW')) {
      dfd.resolve();
    } else {
      dfd.reject();
    }
  }, 0);
  
  return dfd.promise();
};

$('.container').on('click', '.another-page', function (e) {
  e.stopPropagation();
  e.preventDefault();
  async().done(function () {
    $(e.currentTarget).removeClass('another-page').click();
  });
});

$('body').on('click', function (e) {
  alert('navigating somewhere else woot!')
});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<div class="container">
  <a href="#" class="another-page">Somewhere else</a>
</div>

The reason I added the event listener to the parent and not the link itself is because the jQuery's on event will bind to the element until told otherwise. So even though the element does not have the class another-page it still has the event listener attached thus you have to take advantage of event delegation to solve this problem.

GOTCHAS this is very state based. i.e. if you need to ask the user EVERYTIME they click on a link you'll have to add a 2nd listener to readd the another-page class back on to the link. i.e.:

$('body').on('click', function (e) {
  $(e.currentTarget).addClass('another-page');
});

side note you could also remove the event listener on container if the user accepts, if you do this make sure you use namespace events because there might be other listeners on container you might inadvertently remove. see https://api.jquery.com/event.namespace/ for more details.

share|improve this answer

This is untested but might serve as a workaround for you

$('a.my-link').click(function(e) {
  e.preventDefault(); e.stopPropogation();
  MyApp.confirm("Are you sure you want to navigate away?")
    .done(function() {
      //continue propogation of e
      $(this).unbind('click').click()
  })
})
share|improve this answer
    
This would unbind all click event handlers! Also this guard would only occur once so any client-side page caching is out the window. I have workarounds, just wondering if there is something more idiomatic. –  George Mauer Oct 18 '11 at 18:55

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