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How to find number of trailing 0s in a binary number?Based on K&R bitcount example of finding 1s in a binary number i modified it a bit to find the trailing 0s.

int bitcount(unsigned x)
{
  int b;
  for(b=0;x!=0;x>>=1)
      {
        if(x&01)
          break;
        else
          b++;
      }

I would like to review this method.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's a way to compute the count in parallel for better efficiency:

unsigned int v;      // 32-bit word input to count zero bits on right
unsigned int c = 32; // c will be the number of zero bits on the right
v &= -signed(v);
if (v) c--;
if (v & 0x0000FFFF) c -= 16;
if (v & 0x00FF00FF) c -= 8;
if (v & 0x0F0F0F0F) c -= 4;
if (v & 0x33333333) c -= 2;
if (v & 0x55555555) c -= 1;
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1  
How does it work? It's hard to understand how it was derived. –  Craig McQueen Oct 8 '13 at 11:34

On GCC on X86 platform you can use __builtin_ctz(no) On Microsoft compilers for X86 you can use _BitScanForward

They both emit a bsf instruction

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Another approach (I'm surprised it's not mentioned here) would be to build a table of 256 integers, where each element in the array is the lowest 1 bit for that index. Then, for each byte in the integer, you look up in the table.

Something like this (I haven't taken any time to tweak this, this is just to roughly illustrate the idea):

int bitcount(unsigned x)
{
   static const unsigned char table[256] = { /* TODO: populate with constants */ };

   for (int i=0; i<sizeof(x); ++i, x >>= 8)
   {
      unsigned char r = table[x & 0xff];

      if (r)
         return r + i*8;    // Found a 1...
   }

   // All zeroes...
   return sizeof(x)*8;
}

The idea with some of the table-driven approaches to a problem like this is that if statements cost you something in terms of branch prediction, so you should aim to reduce them. It also reduces the number of bit shifts. Your approach does an if statement and a shift per bit, and this one does one per byte. (Hopefully the optimizer can unroll the for loop, and not issue a compare/jump for that.) Some of the other answers have even fewer if statements than this, but a table approach is simple and easy to understand. Of course you should be guided by actual measurements to see if any of this matters.

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I think your method is working (allthough you might want to use unsigned int). You check the last digit each time, and if it's zero, you discard it an increment the number of trailing zero-bits.

I think for trailing zeroes you don't need a loop.

Consider the following:

  • What happens with the number (in binary representation, of course) if you subtract 1? Which digits change, which stay the same?
  • How could you combine the original number and the decremented version such that only bits representing trailing zeroes are left?

If you apply the above steps correctly, you can just find the highest bit set in O(lg n) steps (look here if you're interested in how to do).

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Should be:

int bitcount(unsigned char x)
{
  int b;
  for(b=0; b<7; x>>=1)
  {
    if(x&1)
      break;
    else
      b++;
  }
  return b;
}

or even

int bitcount(unsigned char x)
{
  int b;
  for(b=0; b<7 && !(x&1); x>>=1) b++;
  return b;
}

or even (yay!)

int bitcount(unsigned char x)
{
  int b;
  for(b=0; b<7 && !(x&1); b++) x>>=1;
  return b;
}

or ...

Ah, whatever, there are 100500 millions methods of doing this. Use whatever you need or like.

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Link provided just for a reference, and it's for bit counting. But you got the idea. –  Andrejs Cainikovs Oct 18 '11 at 18:51
    
What's the usage of x>>1 in these codes when they don't save? –  deepmax Oct 18 '11 at 19:22
    
Well, it's weird to hear this question from someone trying to implement such a task. It's called a bit shift: cs.umd.edu/class/sum2003/cmsc311/Notes/BitOp/bitshift.html –  Andrejs Cainikovs Oct 18 '11 at 20:16
    
"Shifting Doesn't Change Values", said in your mentioned link. x>>1; without saving the result in a variable. It's like writing i+1; !!! –  deepmax Oct 18 '11 at 20:21
    
Oh! Typo :) Thanks. –  Andrejs Cainikovs Oct 18 '11 at 20:23

I have fast and efficient function:

int bitcount(unsigned __int64 value)
{
    if (!value)
        return SOME_DEFAULT_VALUE;

    value &= -value;
    unsigned int lsb = (unsigned) value | (unsigned) (value >> 32);
    return (int)(((((((((((unsigned) (value >> 32) != 0) * 2)
            + ((lsb & 0xffff0000) != 0)) * 2)
            + ((lsb & 0xff00ff00) != 0)) * 2)
            + ((lsb & 0xf0f0f0f0) != 0)) * 2)
            + ((lsb & 0xcccccccc) != 0)) * 2)
            + ((lsb & 0xaaaaaaaa) != 0);
}

but be careful, as you see there is 2 issues with this:

  1. This function is defined for 64 bit integers. (you can use it with some casting)
  2. For 0 value, you must define a default value. (for example 0 or -1)

i think these issues are tolerable with some care.

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We can easily get it using bit operations, we don't need to go through all the bits. Pseudo code:

int bitcount(unsigned x) {
    int xor = x ^ (x-1); // this will have (1 + #trailing 0s) trailing 1s
    return log(i & xor); // i & xor will have only one bit 1 and its log should give the exact number of zeroes
}
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