Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a generic software product that 3 potential clients customers (maybe more) might be interested in. The thing is for every customer this said generic product will have to be modified/customized according to their specific needs.

The customization entails more or less :

database change requirements

core module & functionality changes

artwork-graphics,logos etc.

Currently I have been using the feature workflow for my generic product development with my team of 5+ developers all contributing towards the generic product repository

Our current workflow on the generic product is similiar to this illustration here -

http://nvie.com/posts/a-successful-git-branching-model/

Now, what i want to do is change the current workflow to something like this below in order to customize every version of the generic product for a customer.

My proposed new git workflow :

Assumptions :

There are 3 customers that need their own specific customized version of the generic product.

  1. FORK from the generic repository creating a new repository for every customer eg.

    **generic_customerA**
    **generic_customerB**  
    

    and so on.

  2. Setup users/access rights etc.
  3. User clones the specific repository eg. generic_customerA
  4. users make changes,creates branches and commits to his repository.
  5. user merges the his branch with master
  6. Push to the remote.

From what i can see the only thing worth worrying about is the amount of repositories that will be created for each customer but its a price worth paying for simplicity sake and less repository management overhead right?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you are creating the separate repositories so each client's repo is physically separated from each other, then this workflow is fine.

Your central repo then becomes the upstream for these client repos, which is a very common model in git - the clients' work on their branches periodically pulling from your master and merging in the changes.

share|improve this answer
    
In my situation client & customer terms are ambiguous. I will update the question to reflect this. Thanks for answering my question Richard. –  Chesney Oct 18 '11 at 21:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.