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Let's suppose I have a number which represents the minutes passed from the start time to now.

I wan to create a function which returns the years, months, week and days corresponding to the minutes I am passing to that function.

Here an example:

var minutes = 635052; // 635052 = (24*60)*365 + (24*60)*30*2 + (24*60)*14 + (24*60)*2 + 12;
getDataHR(minutes); // 1 year, 2 months, 2 week, 2 days, 12 minutes

function getDataHR (newMinutes) {
      minutes = newMinutes;
      .......
      return hrData; // 1 year, 2 months, 2 week, 2 days, 12 minutes
}

What is the best way to achieve the result?

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What have you tried so far? –  Matt Ball Oct 18 '11 at 19:47
1  
Do you use some reference date for 0 minute? It might be needed for calculating the correct month length. –  biziclop Oct 18 '11 at 19:47
    
Yes, the reference for 0 minutes is the current date. So var minutes = 2; means 2 minutes from now. –  antonjs Oct 18 '11 at 19:56
    
You will have to be a lot more precise to get a decent answer. What do you mean by "months, weeks, and days?" Today is October 18th. How many months, weeks, and days are there between now and the same time on November 29th (35 days away)? How many days are there between 11:59PM today and 12:01AM tomorrow? Zero? One? –  kevin cline Oct 18 '11 at 20:10
    
Use the JavaScript native Date object. –  GAgnew Oct 18 '11 at 20:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Maybe like this?

var units = {
    "year": 24*60*365,
    "month": 24*60*30,
    "week": 24*60*7,
    "day": 24*60,
    "minute": 1
}

var result = []

for(var name in units) {
  var p =  Math.floor(value/units[name]);
  if(p == 1) result.push(p + " " + name);
  if(p >= 2) result.push(p + " " + name + "s");
  value %= units[name]

}
share|improve this answer

You need to use division and modulus:

function getDataHR (newMinutes) {
    var hrData = "";

    var years = minutes / YEAR_IN_MINUTES; // int division = no remainder
    hrData += years + "years";
    minutes = minutes % YEAR_IN_MINUTES;

    // ... continue for months, weeks, days, hours, etc. in that order

    return hrData; // 1 year, 2 months, 2 week, 2 days, 12 minutes
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why is it int division and not float? –  jgritty Oct 18 '11 at 20:11
    
In javascript it might make it into a float. So you can just surround it with Math.floor(...) to round it down. –  jtfairbank Oct 18 '11 at 20:37

I did it like this, because I didn't even know there was a modulo operator in javascript:

var minutes = 635052; // 635052 = (24*60)*365 + (24*60)*30*2 + (24*60)*14 + (24*60)*2 + 12;
getDataHR(minutes); // 1 year, 2 months, 2 week, 2 days, 12 minutes

function getDataHR (newMinutes) {
    MINS_PER_YEAR = 24 * 365 * 60
    MINS_PER_MONTH = 24 * 30 * 60
    MINS_PER_WEEK = 24 * 7 * 60
    MINS_PER_DAY = 24 * 60
    minutes = newMinutes;
    years = Math.floor(minutes / MINS_PER_YEAR)
    minutes = minutes - years * MINS_PER_YEAR
    months = Math.floor(minutes / MINS_PER_MONTH)
    minutes = minutes - months * MINS_PER_MONTH
    weeks = Math.floor(minutes / MINS_PER_WEEK)
    minutes = minutes - weeks * MINS_PER_WEEK
    days = Math.floor(minutes / MINS_PER_DAY)
    minutes = minutes - days * MINS_PER_DAY
    return years + " year(s) " + months + " month(s) " + weeks + " week(s) " + days + " day(s) " + minutes + " minute(s)"
    //return hrData; // 1 year, 2 months, 2 week, 2 days, 12 minutes
}
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Building off of thg435's response above, I created a function that converts seconds to days, hours, minutes, and seconds:

function secondsToString(seconds)
{
   var value = seconds;

   var units = {
       "day": 24*60*60,
       "hour": 60*60,
       "minute": 60,
       "second": 1
   }

   var result = []

   for(var name in units) {
     var p =  Math.floor(value/units[name]);
     if(p == 1) result.push(" " + p + " " + name);
     if(p >= 2) result.push(" " + p + " " + name + "s");
     value %= units[name]
   }

   return result;

}

I also added some spaces to the result to give the commas some room. Output looks like:

1 day, 3 hours, 52 minutes, 7 seconds.
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