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Does anyone know if I should be able to use property placeholder as an expression in a Qualifier? I can't seem to get this working.

I am using spring 3.0.4.

@Controller
public class MyController {
   @Autowired
   @Qualifier("${service.class}")
   Service service;
}

@Service
@Qualifier("ServiceA")
ServiceA implements Service {
   public void print() {
       System.out.println("printing ServiceA.print()");
   } 
}

@Service
@Qualifier("ServiceB")
ServiceB implements Service {
   public void print() {
      System.out.println("printing ServiceB.print()");
   } 
}

XML:

<bean id="propertyConfigurer" class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer">
        <property name="location" value="file:/etc/config.properties"/>
</bean>

config.properties:

config.properties
service.class=serviceB
share|improve this question
1  
are you using spring 3? –  Kevin Oct 18 '11 at 19:49
    
Yes. Updated the question. –  Langali Oct 18 '11 at 19:56
    
what would be the point of doing this in a properties file and with @Qualifier when you could just choose how to wire the bean up in the XML instead? –  matt b Oct 18 '11 at 20:10
    
Have you looked at spring-3 profile beans? It seems like that might be what you're looking for. It does seem like you should be able to do what you're asking, since spring-3 has @Value annotations that support resolving properties. But I just don't know for sure. –  Kevin Oct 18 '11 at 20:13
    
@matt Just Wanted to minimize the use of XML. And property file because different deployments will use different implementations. –  Langali Oct 18 '11 at 20:22

3 Answers 3

This works. You can leave off the service names if you just use the default spring bean name. serviceA vs ServiceA, etc.

@Controller
class MyController {
@Autowired(required=false)
@Qualifier("Service")
Service service;

public static void main(String[] args) {
   ApplicationContext context = new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("app-ctx.xml", MyController.class);
   for(String s:context.getBeanDefinitionNames()){
       System.out.println(s);
       for(String t:context.getAliases(s)){
           System.out.println("\t" + t);
       }
   }
   context.getBean(MyController.class).service.print();
  }
}

public interface Service {
    void print();
}

@Service(value="ServiceA")
public class ServiceA implements example.Service {
    public void print() {
        System.out.println("printing ServiceA.print()");
    } 
}

@Service(value="ServiceB")
public class ServiceB implements example.Service {
    public void print() {
        System.out.println("printing ServiceB.print()");
    } 
}

XML:

<beans>
    <alias name="${service.class}" alias="Service"/>
    <context:property-placeholder location="example/app.properties"/>
    <context:component-scan base-package="example"/>
<beans>

Props:

service.class=ServiceB
share|improve this answer
1  
Dunno why this has not been accepted. It is definetly the neatest way to do what the OP wanted. +1 –  lost Oct 25 '12 at 10:29
    
nice solution... –  Ignacio A. Poletti Feb 22 '13 at 15:01
    
Is there any reason why you added required="false" on the @Autowired annotation? –  steve.hanson May 12 at 22:19

I would venture to guess the answer is no, just based on the write ups in a few javadoc pages. For example, see the docs for @Value:

http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.1.x/javadoc-api/org/springframework/beans/factory/annotation/Value.html

Notice they make special mention of using expressions in the annotation. For comparison, the docs for @Qualifier:

http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.1.x/javadoc-api/org/springframework/beans/factory/annotation/Qualifier.html

Which make no mention of expressions. Obviously not a definitive answer (but spring is generally very good on documentation). Also, if expressions were supported in the @Qualifier annotation I would expect they work the same way as the @Value annotation (just based on spring being a very consistent framework).

Spring 3.1 has the new profile bean feature, which seems like it can accomplish something like what you're trying to do. Here's a write up for that:

http://blog.springsource.com/2011/02/14/spring-3-1-m1-introducing-profile/

share|improve this answer

Maybe give this a whirl:

@Controller
public class MyController {

   private String serviceId;

   @Value("${serviceId}")
   public void setServiceId(String serviceId) {
      this.serviceId = serviceId;
   }

   @Autowired
   @Qualifier(serviceId)
   Service service;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Annotation values have to be constants, so this doesn't work –  JodaStephen Nov 4 '11 at 15:51
    
@Aaron docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/guide/language/… Annotations consist of an at-sign (@) followed by an annotation type and a parenthesized list of element-value pairs. The values must be compile-time constants So the workaround with an instance String will not work course of a compile error .... –  beagle Aug 13 '12 at 15:50

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