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I am trying to learn Threading in .Net.

Many of you must have seen this:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadStart(loop));
    t.Start();
}

private void loop()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
    {
        textBox1.Text = i.ToString();
    }
}

It works fine, but what if my loop method has parameters in it, like:

private void loop(string str)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
    {
        textBox1.Text = i + str;
    }
}

Then how to call this method in my ThreadStart as ThreadStart accepts just the method name. Then how to call loop method in a different thread?

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3  
if textBox1 is a WinForms or WPF text box, then don't do this. The .Text property can only be changed by the thread which created the TextBox, which is obviously not the thread that you're about to start. Look into either BackgroundWorker or Control.Invoke() (for WinForms) or Dispatcher (for WPF). –  dlev Oct 18 '11 at 19:50
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
Thread t = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(loop));
t.Start("Hello world");

private void loop(object obj)
{
    string str = (string)obj;

    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
    {
        // Don't do this: you can't change a control from another thread. Danger Will Robinson!
        textBox1.Text = i + str;
    }
}

Note that the loop method must accept an object parameter, so you'll have to upcast the object to your type. If you don't want, you can use a closure and an anonymous method:

string str = "Hello world";
Thread t = new Thread(() => {
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
    {
        // Don't do this: you can't change a control from another thread. Danger Will Robinson!   
        textBox1.Text = i + str;
    }
});
t.Start();

In this way the anonymous method will "close" around str and it will be similar as if you had passed the parameter. Similar because there are differences/problems on closing variables. In reality I would write something similar to:

string str = "Hello world";

{
    string str2 = str;

    Thread t = new Thread(() => {
        for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
        {
            // Don't do this: you can't change a control from another thread. Danger Will Robinson! 
            textBox1.Text = i + str2;
        }
    });

    t.Start();
}

so that no one else can "touch" str2.

If you need I can find some answer on SO that explain this "problem"

share|improve this answer
    
thanks....it solved my problem. Any further information will be greatly appreciated. –  Sandy Oct 18 '11 at 20:06
    
@rapsalands Here there is the q/a about closures and variables stackoverflow.com/q/512166/613130 –  xanatos Oct 18 '11 at 20:13
    
thanks Xanatos.. –  Sandy Oct 18 '11 at 20:15
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You'd use ParameterizedThreadStart instead: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.parameterizedthreadstart.aspx

Thread t = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(loop));
t.Start("Foo");

// Note the use of Object here to match the delegate signature
private void loop(Object state)
{
    var str = state as String;
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
    {
        // For what it is worth, this is illegal:
        // textBox1.Text = i + str;
        // You need to Invoke back to the UI thread to access a control's properties:
        textBox1.Invoke(()=> { textBox1.Text = i + str; });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot Chris.... –  Sandy Oct 18 '11 at 20:07
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There is a ParameterizedThreadStart class that Delegates with a single parameter can be cast to when instantiating a Thread:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Thread t = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(loop));
    t.Start(str);
}

private void loop(string str)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
    {
        //the code you had is a no-no when you are multithreading;
        //all UI updates must occur on the main thread
        //textBox1.Text = i + str;
        UpdateTextBoxText(textBox1, i+str);
    }
}

private void UpdateTextBoxText(TextBox textBox, string text)
{
   //the method will invoke itself on the main thread if it isn't already running there
   if(InvokeRequired)
   {
      this.Invoke((MethodInvoker)(()=>UpdateTextBoxText(TextBox textBox, string text)));
      return;
   }

   textBox.Text = text;
}

If you don't need very fine-grained control over when the thread starts and stops, you can leave it to the ThreadPool and use Delegate.BeginInvoke:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Action<string> method = loop;

    method.BeginInvoke(str, null, null);
}

private void loop(string str)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
    {
        //textBox1.Text = i + str;
        UpdateTextBoxText(textBox1, i+str);
    }
}

private void UpdateTextBoxText(TextBox textBox, string text)
{
   //the method will invoke itself on the main thread if it isn't already running there
   if(InvokeRequired)
   {
      this.Invoke((MethodInvoker)(()=>UpdateTextBoxText(textBox, text)));
      return;
   }

   textBox.Text = text;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks keith....+1 –  Sandy Oct 18 '11 at 20:09
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Take a look at ParameterizedThreadStart, it allows you to pass parameters into your thread start function.

share|improve this answer
    
will surely do it...thanks –  Sandy Oct 18 '11 at 20:07
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Like this:

new Thread(() => loop("MyString")).Start();

You don't even have to mess with ThreadStart/ParameterizedThreadStart.

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