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I am trying to malloc and free a small array/table of single letter strings. I know that this can be done in an array, but I want to try and do this with a malloc and free.

I have this right now:

char **letters = (char**) malloc(5 * sizeof(char*));
int i =0;
for(i=0; i < NUMLETTERS ; ++i )
{
    letters[i] = (char*) malloc(2*sizeof(char)); //2 is for the letter and null terminator
}

letters[0] = "a";
letters[1] = "b";
letters[2] = "c";
letters[3] = "d";
letters[4] = "e";

//Do stuff here

int i =0;
for(i=0; i < 5; ++i )
{
    free(letters[i]);
}


free(letters);

The above code compiles fine and my code in between also works and runs fine, but at runtime it gets an error during the free parts. Also, after using valgrind..it says that the free(letters[i]); is invalid.

Any help?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is here:

letters[0] = "a";
letters[1] = "b";
letters[2] = "c";
letters[3] = "d";
letters[4] = "e";

You are overwriting each of your malloc'ed pointers with string literals. Then you free them in the final loop. Since you are effectively freeing the string literals, it fails.

There are two ways to solve this:

1: You don't need the inner allocation if you are just assigning string literals to them. So get rid of both loops.

2: strcpy each of the string literals instead.

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Ah! I should be doing something like: strcpy(letters[0], "a"); Right? –  Flipper Oct 18 '11 at 19:52
    
Correct, that will work. –  Mysticial Oct 18 '11 at 19:53

You are correctly allocating memory for each string in the array, but then you aren't using that memory. You are instead altering the char* pointers in each of the five array elements to point to the string literals "a", "b", "c", etc.

So, you have lost the references to the original memory you allocated, and you are instead trying to free memory which doesn't belong to you.

Instead of assigning the string pointers like this:

letters[0] = "a";

you should be copying the string into the memory you've allocated, like this:

strncpy(letters[0], "a", 2);
share|improve this answer
    
the size argument should be 2 to include the '\0'. Here's a test snippet to prove my point: int main(int argc, char**argv) { char * str1 = "a"; char str2 [2]; str2[1] = 0xFF; strncpy(str2, str1, 1); printf("str2[0]=%x, str2[1]=%x\n", str2[0] & 0xFF, str2[1] & 0xFF); } –  Brian McFarland Oct 18 '11 at 20:21
    
Fixed now, thanks. –  Graham Borland Oct 18 '11 at 21:35

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