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We have several annotated tags in our git repository. The older tags have bogus messages that we would like to update to be in our new style.

% git tag -n1
v1.0 message
v1.1 message
v1.2 message
v2.0 Version 2.0 built on 15 October 2011.

In this example, we would like to make v1.x messages look like the v2.0 message. Anyone know how we would do this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 87 down vote accepted

git tag <tag name> <tag name> -f -m "<new message>"

This will create a new tag with the same name (by overwriting the original).

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3  
Does this maintain the original tag's date? –  James M. Greene May 22 '13 at 16:06
3  
Answer to my own comment question: Yes, it does change the date. :( –  James M. Greene May 22 '13 at 16:18
7  
See the "On Backdating Tags" section in git tag --help. –  dahlbyk May 22 '13 at 16:20
2  
It should also be noted that you can also append multiple messages (they get separated by a new line - on GitHub) git tag <tag name> <tag name> -f -m "<new message>" -m "<new message>" -m "<new message>" –  Blair McMillan Feb 12 '14 at 0:07
2  
@ChrisMorley looks at my answer below stackoverflow.com/a/23532519/603949 - in short, use <tag name>^{} when you want to replace the old tag –  Sungam Aug 23 '14 at 11:24

To update a complex message, just specify the annotated tag option with -a or the signed tag option with -s:

git tag <tag name> <tag name> -f -a

This will open an editor with the contents of your old tag message.

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git tag <tag name> <tag name>^{} -f -a

This is an improvement over Andy and Eric Hu's answers. Their answers will create a new tag object that reference the old tag object, where both of them will have the same tag name.

<tag name>^{} will resolve the tag/reference until it find the first commit hash.

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1  
git tag -a <tag name> -f appears to modify the original. –  Brent Foust Oct 8 '14 at 22:37
2  
@BrentFoust, that works only when your head is at the tagged commit usage: git tag [-a|-s|-u <key-id>] [-f] [-m <msg>|-F <file>] <tagname> [<head>] –  Sungam Oct 9 '14 at 0:47

Building on Sungram's answer (originally proposed as an edit):

1. Accepted answer

This is an improvement over Andy and Eric Hu's answers. Their answers will create a new tag object that references the old tag object and both are going to have the same name.

To illustrate this, consider the following:

> git tag tag1 tag1 -f -a  # accepted answer
> git rev-list --objects -g --no-walk --all
[ example output: ]
6bdcc347fca041a5138f89fdf5276b3ebf9095d5
260ab7928d986472895b8c55e54569b3f3cb9517 tag1
a5797673f610914a45ef7ac051e3ee831a6e7c25 tag1
f22d6308c3cd330a3b0d86b9bf05562faf6b6f17

> git show tag1
tag tag1
Tagger: [tagger]
Date:   [date of updated tag]
[Updated description]

tag tag1
Tagger: [tagger]
Date:   [date of original tag]
[Original description]

[tagged commit details]

2. Sungram's improvement

Using <tag name>^{} as the second argument of git tag will instead delete all previous tags with the same name.

Consider the continuation of the previous terminal session:

> git tag tag1 tag1^{} -f -a  # suggested improvement
> git rev-list --objects -g --no-walk --all
[ example output: ]
6bdcc347fca041a5138f89fdf5276b3ebf9095d5
75f02acacfd7d91d55b5bcfdfb1f00aebeed15e3 tag1
f22d6308c3cd330a3b0d86b9bf05562faf6b6f17 

> git show tag1
tag tag1
Tagger: [tagger]
Date:   [date of updated tag]
[Updated description]

[tagged commit details]

3. Save the date

Lastly, if you want to keep the date of the original tag as the date of the updated tag, use some awk (or similar) magic or just paste the date you want instead. The following is a substitute for the second example (otherwise the original date would be lost due to overriding):

> GIT_COMMITTER_DATE="$(git show tag1 |                              # get info about the tag cascade including the date original of the original tag
> awk '{
>     if ($1 == "Date:") {
>         print substr($0, index($0,$3))
>     }
> }' |                                                               # extract all the dates from the info
> tail -2 | head -1)"                                               `# get the second to last date, as the last one is the commit date` \
> git tag tag1 tag1^{} -a -f                                         # finally, update the tag message, but save the date of the old one
>
> git rev-list --objects -g --no-walk --all
6bdcc347fca041a5138f89fdf5276b3ebf9095d5
e18c178f2a548b37799b100ab90ca785af1fede0 tag1
f22d6308c3cd330a3b0d86b9bf05562faf6b6f17
> git show tag1
tag tag1
Tagger: [tagger]
Date:   [date of original tag]
[Updated description]

[tagged commit details]

References:

4. DIY

Alternatively to updating the tags, you can just delete them and create them again. As it turns out updating just adds a new tag and makes it point to the old one, or alternatively, just implicitly deletes the old one and creates a new one to point to the same commit anyway.

You can achieve this by issuing:

> git tag -d <tag-name>
> [GIT_COMMITTER_DATE=<original-commit-date>] \
> [GIT_AUTHOR_NAME=<original-author-name>] \
> git tag <tag-name> [commit]

Here [optional] is an optional field; <required> is a required field. Of course, you can add any flags after the git tag command that you normally would.

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You will have to tag again, using the -f force flag.

git tag v1.0 -f -m "actual message"
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This solution supposes that the current git head is at version 1.0. This can mess things up if it isn't, as it changes the revision associated to version 1.0. Andy's solution avoids this pitfall. –  EOL May 29 '12 at 9:28

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