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I want to use a date range (from one date to another date) as a key for a dictionary, so I wrote my own struct:

   struct DateRange
   {
      public DateTime Start;
      public DateTime End;

      public DateRange(DateTime start, DateTime end)
      {
         Start = start.Date;
         End = end.Date;
      }

      public override int GetHashCode()
      {
         // ???
      }
   }

What's the best way to implement GetHashCode so no two objects of a differing range will generate the same hash? I want hash collisions to be as unlikely as possible, though I understand Dictionary<> will still check the equality operator which I will also implement, but didn't want to pollute the example code too much. Thanks!

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Perhaps this is of interest for you - a really nice introduction to GetHashCode: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/02/28/… –  Stephan Schinkel Oct 18 '11 at 21:06
3  
Aside from GetHashCode: mutable structs and public fields are both generally a bad idea. –  Jon Skeet Oct 18 '11 at 21:11
    
You think I should switch to a class with public DateTime Start { get; set; } instead? –  Mike Christensen Oct 18 '11 at 21:14
2  
No, you should not allow the fields to mutate at all. Make them private and readonly, set them via the constructor (as you do already), and provide read-only "get" properties to those fields. –  Jesse C. Slicer Oct 18 '11 at 21:16
    
Ah gotcha - I'll do that instead. –  Mike Christensen Oct 18 '11 at 21:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use the method from Effective Java as Jon Skeet shows here. For your specific type:

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    unchecked // Overflow is fine, just wrap
    {
        int hash = 17;
        hash = hash * 23 + Start.GetHashCode();
        hash = hash * 23 + End.GetHashCode();
        return hash;
    }
}
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I like it, thanks! –  Mike Christensen Oct 18 '11 at 21:09

Something like this:) with a different prime number:)

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    unchecked  
    {
        int hash = 23;
        // Suitable nullity checks etc, of course :)
        hash = hash * 31 + Start.GetHashCode();
        hash = hash * 31 + End.GetHashCode();
        return hash;
    }
}

This is not the fastest implementation but it produces a good hash code. Joshua bloch indicates that as well and you also calculate the performance, ^ is usually faster. correct me if i m wrong.

See Jon Skeets impl for c# :

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1  
-1: while this is good, it's a pretty close to direct lift from here: stackoverflow.com/questions/263400/… without attribution. –  Jesse C. Slicer Oct 18 '11 at 21:14
4  
Your four retribution downvotes are also totally unnecessary. –  Jesse C. Slicer Oct 18 '11 at 21:18
1  
Why are people downvoting this and upvoting Mark Byers' answer, when they're essentially the same answer? –  Joe White Oct 18 '11 at 21:21
1  
I downvoted because, while perhaps originally discussed on Joshua Bloch's book, the C# code presented is clearly Jon Skeet's implementation (including the comment), which was not credited. Mark Byers' answer DID credit the code source. –  Jesse C. Slicer Oct 18 '11 at 21:27
1  
great. thanks:) and will edit. –  DarthVader Oct 18 '11 at 21:28

Since DateTime.GetHashCode is internally based on Ticks, what about this:

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return unchecked((int)(Start.Ticks ^ End.Ticks));
    }

Or, since you seem to be interested by the date parts (year, month, day), not the whole thing, this implementation uses the number of days between the two dates and should give almost no collision:

        public override int GetHashCode()
        {
            return unchecked((int)Start.Date.Year * 366 + Start.Date.DayOfYear + (End.Date - Start.Date).Days);
        }
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Combining Jon Skeet's answer and comment on the question (so please, no voting on this, just consolidating):

struct DateRange
{
    private readonly DateTime start;

    private readonly DateTime end;

    public DateRange(DateTime start, DateTime end)
    {
        this.start = start.Date;
        this.end = end.Date;
    }

    public DateTime Start
    {
        get
        {
            return this.start;
        }
    }

    public DateTime End
    {
        get
        {
            return this.end;
        }
    }

    public static bool operator ==(DateRange dateRange1, DateRange dateRange2)
    {
        return dateRange1.Equals(dateRange2);
    }

    public static bool operator !=(DateRange dateRange1, DateRange dateRange2)
    {
        return !dateRange1.Equals(dateRange2);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        // Overflow is fine, just wrap
        unchecked
        {
            var hash = 17;

            // Suitable nullity checks etc, of course :)
            hash = (23 * hash) + this.start.GetHashCode();
            hash = (23 * hash) + this.end.GetHashCode();
            return hash;
        }
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return (obj is DateRange)
            && this.start.Equals(((DateRange)obj).Start)
            && this.end.Equals(((DateRange)obj).End);
    }
}
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Of course, looking at it now, seems like it would be a good idea to override 'Equals()', 'operator==' and 'operator!=' too. –  Jesse C. Slicer Oct 19 '11 at 1:14

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