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I'm trying to write a generic wrapper in C++. Here is what I've written so far:

//primary template 
template<typename T> 
class function
{
};
//partially specialized template

template<typename T, typename U, typename V> 
class wrapper<T(U,V)> 
{
private:
   //typedef pointer to function
   typedef T (*pfn)(U,V);
   pfn f;

public:

  wrapper(pfn func):f(func)
  {
  };

  T operator()(U a, V b)
  {
    return f(a,b);
  }
};

Which can be instantiated using, for example:

wrapper<double(double, double)> someWrapper( &someFunction );

I was wondering if somebody could point me in the right direction in terms of how to modify the wrapper template to be able to instantiate in the following ways as well:

wrapper<double(double, double)> somewrapper( &someClass, &someClass::someFunction)
wrapper<double(someClass*, double)> somewrapper( &someClass::someFunction)

I'd appreciate any help in this.

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5  
What's wrong with std::function? –  Kerrek SB Oct 18 '11 at 21:47
    
Boost already has this in Boost.Function: boost.org/doc/libs/1_47_0/doc/html/function.html –  Dani Oct 18 '11 at 21:47
    
loki-lib.sourceforge.net –  cli_hlt Oct 18 '11 at 21:47
1  
I'd suggest you read up on the difference between a regular function and a member function and the syntactical differences on invocation before you attempt this. –  Nathan Ernst Oct 18 '11 at 21:49
    
Just read the source for std::function. The GNU stdc++ library implementation uses variadic templates in the C++0x implementation. Very enlightening –  sehe Oct 18 '11 at 21:53
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use std::function instead, or the Boost implementation if your compiler does not have TR1 yet. That said, this is the specialization you are looking for pointer to member functions:

template<typename T, typename C, typename U, typename V> 
class wrapper<T (C::*)(U,V)> 
{
private:
   //typedef pointer to member-function
   typedef T (C::*pfn)(U,V);
   pfn f;

public:

  wrapper(pfn func):f(func)
  {
  };

  T operator()(C c, U a, V b)
  {
    return (c.*f)(a,b);
  }
};

and its instantiate like this:

wrapper< double(someClass::*)(double, double) > somewrapper;

The first instantiation you gave is not impossible, but it needs a massive ammount of type erasure to get it to work, since the class type can't be deduced from the constructor argument.

wrapper<double(double, double)> somewrapper( &someClass, &someClass::someFunction)

The second one could be made to work, modifying my example code a bit, assuming you only want to instantiate it with pointer to member functions.

wrapper<double(someClass*, double)> somewrapper( &someClass::someFunction)

Assuming you want a single wrapper definition to be usable for both free and member functions with compatible arguments, you need again some type erasure to make it work. The implementation of Boost.Function actually uses a different technique to avoid virtual calls.

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Thanks for your reply. I did write an implementation similar to yours where the class type was passed as a template parameter, but as you said, I was now looking to see if I could write a single wrapper to cover all these scenarios. It seems to me that it is not trivial to do so! I'll look into type erasure, I was not aware of it. –  Omar Oct 19 '11 at 0:16
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If you're doing this as a programming and learning exercise, then that's fine, but there are many viable alternatives that exist and are thoroughly tested. If using C++11 you can use std::function, otherwise there's boost::function and boost::bind.

Now assuming this is a learning exercise, you will need to create versions of your wrapper for each number of different parameters and return values. You will also need to cover the cases where the function is a class member, and you might want to also deal with the case when you're dealing with a Functor class.

Suffice to say that this is a lot of work, lots of corner cases, just to duplicate something that already exists.

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Thanks for your answer. Yes, as you've probably worked out, this is a learning exercise for me. So I will have a look at these implementation to see how they work. –  Omar Oct 19 '11 at 0:18
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