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Most Json parsers don't serialize NaN, because in Javascript, NaN is not a constant. Json.Net, however, does serialize NaN values into NaN, which means it outputs invalid Json; attempting to deserialize this Json will fail with most parsers. (We're deserializing in WebKit.)

We have hacked the Json.Net code to output null values when passed NaN, but this seems like a poor solution. Douglas Crockford (once) recommended using nulls in place of NaNs:

http://www.json.org/json.ppt (Look at slide 16)

Clearly this won't work in all cases, but it would be ok for our purposes. We'd just rather not have to modify the source code of Json.Net. Does anyone know how to use Json.Net to convert NaN inputs into null outputs?

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

The author advises us to “Write a JsonConverter for float/double to make NaN safe if this is important for you,” so that’s what you can do:

class LawAbidingFloatConverter : JsonConverter {
    public override bool CanRead
    {
        get
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    public override bool CanWrite
    {
        get
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        var val = value as double? ?? (double?) (value as float?);
        if (val == null || Double.IsNaN((double)val) || Double.IsInfinity((double)val))
        {
            writer.WriteNull();
            return;
        }
        writer.WriteValue((double)val);
    }
    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
    {
        return objectType == typeof(double) || objectType == typeof(float);
    }
}

and then use it:

var settings = new JsonSerializerSettings();
var floatConverter = new LawAbidingFloatConverter();
settings.Converters.Add(floatConverter);
var myConverter = new JsonNetSerializer(settings);
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1  
Doesn't work for double AND float - <float-value> as double? is always null! – David Rettenbacher Dec 10 '12 at 12:57
    
You’re right, it does not work for floats. I’m not exactly sure why (double?) value yields null when value is a float but (double?) (float?) value is ok. I’ve updated my answer with a working solution. Thanks! – Raphael Schweikert Dec 10 '12 at 13:33

Raphael Schweikerts solution with float support:

public class StandardFloatConverter : JsonConverter
{
    public override bool CanRead
    {
        get
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    public override bool CanWrite
    {
        get
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        if (value == null)
        {
            writer.WriteNull();
            return;
        }

        var val = Convert.ToDouble(value);
        if(Double.IsNaN(val) || Double.IsInfinity(val))
        {
            writer.WriteNull();
            return;
        }
        // Preserve the type, otherwise values such as 3.14f may suddenly be
        // printed as 3.1400001049041748.
        if (value is float)
            writer.WriteValue((float)value);
        else
            writer.WriteValue((double)value);
    }
    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
    {
        return objectType == typeof(double) || objectType == typeof(float);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
If preserving the original behavior for normal values is important, one may also replace write.WriteValue(val) with if (value is float) writer.WriteValue((float)val); else writer.WriteValue((double)val). Otherwise, suddenly 3.14f may be serialized as 3.1400001049041748 instead of 3.14. This broke one of the unit-tests in my application. – Sergiy Byelozyorov Nov 27 '13 at 8:43
    
Thanks for pointing this out but I couldn't accept your edit anymore (was already rejected!?)... I changed the answer according to your edit. – David Rettenbacher Nov 27 '13 at 10:17

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