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Class a <T> {
   public T j;
}

class b:a <int> {

}

If this were not a generic then you could do the following:

a foo = new b();

Is there anyway to do the same with the generic case?

Is there a better method to do that?

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1  
@DavidePiras: are you sure you didn't change the meaning of the question? it was a bit ambiguous and you chose one interpretation of it. –  Dani Oct 18 '11 at 22:24
    
reverted ;-) I did not see any difference except the colors... –  Davide Piras Oct 18 '11 at 22:31
    
@Dani, the code in the source is not ambiguous at all, it was simply poorly formatted for markdown. You can view the source of the first revision to verify for yourself. Text reformatted to follow original intent. –  Anthony Pegram Oct 18 '11 at 22:44
    
@AnthonyPegram: oh right, my mistake. –  Dani Oct 18 '11 at 22:52
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need the generic parameters declared in a:

class a<T>
{
    public T j;
}

You also need them in b to be able to derive from a:

class b<T> : a<T> { }

and then you can cast b<T> to a<T>:

a<int> foo = new b<int>();

Or you can derive from specific a:

class b : a<int> { }

and then cast:

a<int> foo = new b();
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This isn't the case- the OP's B can be cast to a<int>, it doesn't need type parameters. –  Chris Shain Oct 18 '11 at 22:24
1  
@ChrisShain: thats after someone else's edit, check the original. –  Dani Oct 18 '11 at 22:25
    
Apologies- edit your answer and I'll upvote. –  Chris Shain Oct 18 '11 at 22:32
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You can use:

a<int> foo = new b();
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public static void Main()
{
    Base<int> foo = new Derived();
}

class Base<T>
{
    public T data;
}

class Derived:Base<int>
{
}
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