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I have been struggling a bit to get make to compile only the files that have been edited. However I didn't have much success and all the files get recompiled. Can someone explain me why?

My files are:

main.c
a_functions.c

where main.c includes main.h and a_functions.c includes a.h

Here is my makefile:

CC=gcc
CFLAGS=-Wall -I. -c
EXEC_FILE=program1


all: program

a_functions.o: a_functions.c
a_functions.c: a.h
main.o: main.c
main.c: main.h

objects: a_functions.c main.c
    $(CC) a_functions.c main.c $(CFLAGS)

program: a_functions.o main.o
    $(CC) a_functions.o main.o -o $(EXEC_FILE)

Changing the makefile as per suggestions seems to have the same problem::

all: program

a_functions.o: a_functions.c a.h
    gcc a_functions.c -c

main.o: main.c main.h
    gcc main.c -c

program: a_functions.o main.o
    gcc a_functions.o main.o -o program1
share|improve this question
    
-I. strikes me as strange. What's up with that? –  sarnold Oct 19 '11 at 0:56
2  
@sarnold: just means search for include files in the current directory as well as implementation-defined ones. Whether it's needed is debatable but I don't think it would cause any harm. –  paxdiablo Oct 19 '11 at 0:58
    
@paxdiablo, perhaps, but I'm guessing it is a symptom of another problem. If his platform doesn't provide system-wide headers for something and he's got to provide his own versions, that's one thing, but I'm guessing it is a mistake as it is... –  sarnold Oct 19 '11 at 1:02
    
@sarnold: How is that possibly a mistake? There will almost certainly be header files that need to be included in the current directory in pretty much any program that you'd ever want to compile. –  Falmarri Oct 19 '11 at 1:04
5  
It's not a good idea to change questions in a way that invalidates answers. Feel free to augment the information (see my edit) otherwise SO becomes a lot less useful since answers don't match the questions. –  paxdiablo Oct 19 '11 at 1:32
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2 Answers 2

up vote 21 down vote accepted

The specific problem you're talking about -- Make rebuilds program1 (by relinking the objects) even when nothing has changed -- is in this rule:

program: a_functions.o main.o
    gcc a_functions.o main.o -o program1

The target of this rule is program, and Make assumes that it is a file. But since there is no such file, every time you run Make, Make thinks that this file needs to be rebuilt, and executes the rule. I suggest this:

program1: a_functions.o main.o
    gcc a_functions.o main.o -o program1

Or better, this:

program1: a_functions.o main.o
    gcc $^ -o $@

Or better still this:

$(EXEC_FILE): a_functions.o main.o
    $(CC) $^ -o $@

(And don't forget to change the all rule to match.)

A few other points:

  1. As @paxdiablo pointed out,

    a_functions.o: a_functions.c a.h
    main.o: main.c main.h
    
  2. It doesn't make sense to link these objects together unless something in one (probably main.o) calls something in the other (probably a_functions.o), so I would expect to see a dependency like this:

    main.o: a.h
    

    So I suspect that you have some misplaced declarations.

  3. You declare an objects rule, but never refer to it. So you never actually use it; Make uses the default rule for %.o: %.c. I suggest this:

    OBJECTS = a_functions.o main.o
    $(OBJECTS): %: %.c
        $(CC) $< $(CFLAGS) -o $@
    

    (In which case you can change $(EXEC_FILE): a_functions.o main.o to $(EXEC_FILE): $(OBJECTS).) Or just this:

    %.o: %.c
        $(CC) $< $(CFLAGS) -o $@
    
share|improve this answer
    
Good catch, +1, I think we have a winner. –  paxdiablo Oct 19 '11 at 3:29
    
@Beta thank you from the deepest of my heart! –  Pithikos Oct 19 '11 at 11:02
    
Would .PHONY have helped? (Probably a GNU make only feature, though.) –  David Poole Oct 24 '11 at 20:55
    
@DavidPoole, conceptually yes, it would tell Make that program is not expected to be a file (and should be executed even if such a file happens to exist). Practically, no, since Make would still execute that rule every time, even if nothing had changed. –  Beta Oct 25 '11 at 3:11
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Not sure if this is causing your specific problem but the two lines:

a_functions.c: a.h
main.c: main.h

are definitely wrong, because there's generally no command to re-create a C file based on a header it includes.

C files don't depend on their header files, the objects created by those C files do.

For example, a main.c of:

#include <hdr1.h>
#include <hdr2.h>
int main (void) { return 0; }

would be in the makefile as something like:

main.o: main.c hdr1.h hdr2.h
    gcc -c -o main.o main.c

Change:

a_functions.o: a_functions.c
a_functions.c: a.h
main.o: main.c
main.c: main.h

to:

a_functions.o: a_functions.c a.h
main.o: main.c main.h

(assuming that a_functions.c includes a.h and main.c includes main.h) and try again.

If that assumption above is wrong, you'll have to tell us what C files include what headers so we can tell you the correct rules.


If your contention is that the makefile is still building everything even after those changes, you need look at two things.

The first is the output from ls -l on all relevant files so that you can see what dates and times they have.

The second is the actual output from make. The output of make -d will be especially helpful since it shows what files and dates make is using to figure out what to do.


In terms of investigation, make seems to work fine as per the following transcript:

=====
pax$ cat qq.h
#define QQ 1
=====
pax$ cat qq.c
#include "qq.h"
int main(void) { return 0; }
=====
pax$ cat qq.mk
qq: qq.o
        gcc -o qq qq.o

qq.o: qq.c qq.h
        gcc -c -o qq.o qq.c
=====
pax$ touch qq.c qq.h
=====
pax$ make -f qq.mk
gcc -c -o qq.o qq.c
gcc -o qq qq.o
=====
pax$ make -f qq.mk
make: `qq' is up to date.
share|improve this answer
    
I did as you said but it still recompiles everything. I even tryied to copy your example by having main.o: main.c main.h \n $(CC) main.c $(CFLAGS) but still same problem –  Pithikos Oct 19 '11 at 1:11
1  
@Pithikos: Show us the output of the compiler. Why do you say it's compiling every time. –  Falmarri Oct 19 '11 at 1:20
    
@Falmarri I can see that it recompiles as the program1's date changes every time I 'make'. –  Pithikos Oct 19 '11 at 1:24
1  
The objects don't get recompiled. It's only the program1 that gets relinked. –  Pithikos Oct 19 '11 at 1:40
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