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static in the main class java and non static in constructor

i just want to know if people can agree with me on the knowledge I have about static variable and methods as I'm still learning java in its early concepts.

static variables means when both objects or instances of the class gets shared the same variables. static methods simply means methods that refer to the class that it is written in.

Anyone can correct me if I'm wrong or can add any more information are welcome as I want to be able to learn java to its fullest and do amazing things with java in the future! :)

Happy coding!

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marked as duplicate by trashgod, Robert Harvey Oct 20 '11 at 4:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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I advise you to refer to the Java tutorial –  JRL Oct 19 '11 at 1:46
    
Here's a good read if you're trying to learn more about it. Your example isn't entirely correct. What do you mean by static in Java? –  user882347 Oct 19 '11 at 1:46
    
You might want to critically examine your accept rate and voting record. –  trashgod Oct 19 '11 at 20:43
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You might want to read - Class Variables (Static Fields) and Class Methods.

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Static variables are shared for all instances of the class.

Static methods are accessed directly by class name, not belong to any instances.

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Correct for static variables. For static methods, not really. It is true that you access static methods by prefixing them with the name of their enclosing type, as in ClassName.Method(), but the reason you might want to do that is because an instance of the class is not required to execute the method. –  Robert Harvey Oct 20 '11 at 4:18
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