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I'm learning C and I decided to make a text game as my learning project. So I'm trying this primitive "parser" that reads a text file into a 2D array, but there's a problem: this map doesn't use 1 character-wide cells, it uses 2 character-wide cells. For instance, the player is represented with a **, a door is represented like ## and so on.

That means, I need to read 2 characters of the text file and then assign it to the respective cell in the map.

Well, I made a test file that contains

aabbccddee
ffgghhiijj
kkllmmnnoo
ppqqrrsstt
uuvvwwxxyy

And I tried to read it with

#include <stdio.h>

#define ROWS 5 
#define COLS 5

int main() {
    FILE *mapfile = fopen("durr", "r");
    char charbuffer[3], row, col, *map[ROWS][COLS];

    /* Initializing array */
    for (row = 0; row < ROWS; row++) {
        for (col = 0; col < COLS; col++) {
            map[row][col] = "  ";
        }
    }

    /* Reading file into array */
    for (row = 0; row < ROWS; row++) {
        for (col = 0; col < COLS; col++) {
            map[row][col] = fgets(charbuffer, 3, mapfile);
        }
    }

    /* Printing array */
    for (row = 0; row < ROWS; row++) {
        for (col = 0; col < COLS; col++) {
            printf("%s", map[row][col]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }

    fclose(mapfile);    
    return 0;
}

But when I execute it, I get this

uuuuuuuuuu
uuuuuuuuuu
uuuuuuuuuu
uuuuuuuuuu
uuuuuuuuuu

I think it has something to do with the fact that fgets return a pointer, but I'm not sure. I tried doing it with fgetc but it looks messy and I dropped it after reading about gets.

share|improve this question
1  
There are no strings in C, only character arrays. Hence you cannot assign "strings"! Instead, use strncpy(), and make sure you understand the memory management that's involved. –  Kerrek SB Oct 19 '11 at 3:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should have strdup'ed the contents read from the file. Replace the file reading block with this:

/* Reading file into array */
for (row = 0; row < ROWS; row++) {
    for (col = 0; col < COLS; col++) {
        if (fgets(charbuffer, 3, mapfile))
            map[row][col] = strdup(charbuffer);
    }
}

and don't forget to put this at the beginning of your code too:

#include <string.h>
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is what I was looking for. I was looking for a way of (somehow) dereferencing the return value of fgets but yes, this is what I was looking for. It kinda works now, it's all weirdly formatted. Like this pastebin.com/1F2D5zNp. Could it be I'm doing something wrong? –  user1002327 Oct 19 '11 at 4:11
    
If the idea is to learn C, then he should be getting used to malloc, not invoking a function that isn't even part of the standard. –  Matt Phillips Oct 19 '11 at 4:14
    
It was because of the array sizes, I would say. Don't forget that fgets not only reads upto, but also puts, EOF to the buffer. –  shinkou Oct 19 '11 at 4:20
    
@MattPhillips I do agree with what you said. But I also have to remind you that POSIX is a valid standard. –  shinkou Oct 19 '11 at 4:23
    
Oh, Matt and shinkou, you're right. Guess I'll have to figure out how to solve that problem. And I come from higher-level languages so I never managed memory manually, so I'll read a bit more about that. Thanks, guys. –  user1002327 Oct 19 '11 at 4:24

The main problem is that

char *map[ROWS][COLS];

only allocates space for ROWS x COLS char pointers, it does not allocate space for the strings themselves. So you're continually overwriting charbuffer as you've done it with every iteration, which explains why you end up with the same characters repeated over and over when you read out. You need to dynamically allocate the memory you need, along the lines of

for (row = 0; row < ROWS; row++) {
    for (col = 0; col < COLS; col++) {
        charbuffer = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * 3);  //****
        map[row][col] = fgets(charbuffer, 3, mapfile);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Huh, I'm getting incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘malloc’. Maybe I'm missing something? Could it be my gcc? Oh, and I had to change charbuffer[3] with *charbuffer, otherwise I'd get a incompatible types when assigning to type ‘char[3] from type ‘char *’ error. –  user1002327 Oct 19 '11 at 3:39
    
@user1002327 Right about charbuffer[3] -> charbuffer*, forgot to mention that. As for malloc, try #include "stdlib.h". –  Matt Phillips Oct 19 '11 at 4:05

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