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Well here is the thing, I have MainForm that call OrderForm.Show(). Now I want to call public function in MainForm with a button, but I cant.

Here is the code in MainForm:

public partial class frmMain : Form
{
    public frmMain()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    // Main form
    private void MainFrm_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        FormOrder frmO = new FormOrder();

        frmO.Show();
    }

    public void Refresh() 
    {
        // some action
    }
 }

And in OrderForm I do this:

public partial class FormOrder : Form
{
    public FormOrder()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void ShowForm()
    {
        // some action
    }

    private void btnCopy_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Form  form = Form.ActiveForm as frmMain;

        if (form != null)
        {
            form.Refresh();
        }

    }
}

so in the Program I run MainForm.Show() then load OrderForm. Then I when I click Copy button, it will run Public Function Refresh in MainForm. But I cant make it work, it always return null in:

  Form  form = Form.ActiveForm as frmMain;

so how can I actually get the active form, is it another solution? or I get it wrong?? Thanks in advance for the answer :)

share|improve this question
1  
You should change the title. You want to reference a form from a subform. The main form is not the active form (in the framework sense) at the time you want to reference it. –  TheBlastOne Oct 19 '11 at 10:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're getting a null because your active form is the one you're in and it is not of type frmMain. (I think you may actually be confusing an active form for a parent form?)

There are so may ways to do this. You could make your frmMain a singleton but that's weird and ugly and not recommended of late or you could pass a reference of it to its children somehow. Here's one, simple way:

public partial class frmMain : Form
{
    public frmMain()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    // Main form
    private void MainFrm_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        FormOrder frmO = new FormOrder(this); // pass a ref of self

        frmO.Show();
    }

    public void Refresh() 
    {
        // some action
    }
 }

And in OrderForm:

public partial class FormOrder : Form
{
    private frmMain _parent; // create a field that refers to the parent
    public FormOrder(frmMain parent) // mod the constructor
    {
        if (parent == null) throw new NullReferenceException("Can't be NULL!!!"); // check clause

        _parent = parent; // assign the ref of the parent

        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void ShowForm()
    {
        // some action
    }

    private void btnCopy_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
            _parent.Refresh(); // make the call to parent
    }
}

You could make this better by using an interface but the general idea would be the same.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, I pick this answer because it fit to my current situation :) thanks for all the answer :) –  Mr.Rendezvous Oct 20 '11 at 5:08

While the other answers are absolutely correct, I'd like to suggest a much easier yet "dirty" way to do it.

Every component has a Tag property where you can store any user-defined value or reference in. The idea is to save a reference to the main form in the second form's Tag, and access it from the button click event handler.

The good thing is that you do not have to write a lot of code, or create any data structure.

The dirty thing about it is that neither the framework at runtime nor the compiler at compile-time have any idea what you store in .Tag, and since it is not typed correctly, you are doing a type cast, depending on you storing the correct value there beforehand. If you store the wrong value there, you might have a hard time debugging the cause since the symptom does not signal where you put the wrong value into Tag. So wild Tag usuage in a team of programmers is a good thing if you want to give birth to many unexpected hard-to-detect-and-fix bugs :)

Also, there is only one Tag per component. If you need more than one user-defined value, you might end up creating a custom data structure which Tag then holds a reference to, but that probably is a bigger mess than all of the other suggestions.

public partial class frmMain : Form
{
    public frmMain()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    // Main form
    private void MainFrm_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        FormOrder frmO = new FormOrder();

        frmO.Tag=this;
        frmO.Show();
    }

    public void Refresh() 
    {
        // some action
    }
 }


public partial class FormOrder : Form
{
    public FormOrder()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void ShowForm()
    {
        // some action
    }

    private void btnCopy_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Form  form = Tag as frmMain; // form now references the main form

        if (form != null)
        {
            form.Refresh();
        }

    }
}

A good example for a quick and dirty solution, with limitations so inherent that you usually identify them only when it is too late -- that's why I am telling in the first place ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Well this is interesting thing :D but I use the other answer though. thx :) –  Mr.Rendezvous Oct 20 '11 at 5:06
    
No problem. Accept what helped! –  TheBlastOne Oct 20 '11 at 10:46

You need to have a reference to the mainForm and/or mainForm's button click event that lives outside of mainForm. You can do this is in various ways. Create a static class that has a reference to mainForm, create a static class that has a delegate to the mainForm click event, pass mainForm into the contructor for childForm, pass in a delegate to mainForms click event to the the constructor for the childForm. Create a static method that handles the click event then use that from within childForm.

It really all depends upon what you want to to do, what you need to do, and how you desire to do it.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for pointing out stuff others have not mentioned. –  TheBlastOne Oct 20 '11 at 20:12

I would not suggest you take the route to access the active form to accomplish your target. What you need to do is to pass a reference of the MainForm to the OrderForm, so OrderForm could use the reference to call any method on the MainForm.

private void MainFrm_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
     FormOrder frmO = new FormOrder();
     frmO.MainForm = this;

     frmO.Show();
}

And in FormOrder class you should add a new attribute MainForm, and use the attribute to reference the calling form :-

public partial class FormOrder : Form
{
    public Form MainForm;

    public FormOrder()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void ShowForm()
    {
        // some action
    }

    private void btnCopy_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (MainForm != null)
        {
            MainForm.Refresh();
        }

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This would work too. I like using the constructor to pass the main form better though because there's no way to forget to set a property then and you would not have to check for null. The order form could not be created without passing in a reference to the main form. You could pass a null but a check could be performed in the constructor and the rule that a non-null main form reference exists woudl be enforced. –  Paul Sasik Oct 19 '11 at 3:36
    
Your way in using constructor is good. That's the way it is done in Delphi, where mostly a constructor for a TComponent has AParent as a parameter. I'm not too familiar with .NET, and I find the default constructor does not have this. –  Anton Ng Oct 19 '11 at 3:47

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