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Given an XML document like this:

<r>
  <a/><b/><c/>
  <d>
    <d1/>
    <d2>
      <d2a/>
      <d2b/>
      <d2c/>
    </d2>
  </d>
  <e/>
</r>

And given the criteria "Start at b, stop at d2b" is there an XPath expression that can select either:

Ideally:

<c/><d><d1/><d2><d2a/></d2></d>

Reasonably:

<c/>

I know that with the criteria "start at 'a' and end at 'e'" I can use the expression //*[preceding-sibling::a][following-sibling::e]; I'm wondering if there's a way to do some odd intersection of ancestor axes and preceding siblings to find a common ancestor when the start and end elements are not guaranteed to share the same parent.

share|improve this question
    
the question doesn't require modification of the structure does it? it just requires the returning of a somewhat weird subset. (I don't know if it's possible) –  Steve Bennett Oct 19 '11 at 4:51
1  
@SteveBennett: Actually, the question does require modification of the structure, The OP wants a new structure, in which d2 dosn't have d2b and d2c children -- so these elements have somehow to be deleted -- and XPath can't delete elements! –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 19 '11 at 12:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

XPath (both 1.0 and 2.0) is a query language for XML documents. As such it cannot alter the nodes and structure of any XML document.

The wanted result can be obtained via an XSLT transformation (I. XSLT 1.0 used below):

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:param name="pStart" select="/*/b"/>
 <xsl:param name="pEnd" select="/*/d/d2/d2b"/>

  <xsl:variable name="vFollowingStart" select=
  "$pStart/following::* | $pStart/descendant::*"/>

 <xsl:variable name="vPrecedingEnd" select=
  "$pEnd/preceding::* | $pEnd/ancestor::*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*" name="identity">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="*">
  <xsl:choose>
      <xsl:when test=
      "count(.|$vFollowingStart) = count($vFollowingStart)
      and
       count(.|$vPrecedingEnd) = count($vPrecedingEnd)
      ">
       <xsl:call-template name="identity"/>
      </xsl:when>
      <xsl:otherwise>
       <xsl:apply-templates/>
      </xsl:otherwise>
  </xsl:choose>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when this transformation is applied on the provided XML document:

<r>
  <a/><b/><c/>
  <d>
    <d1/>
    <d2>
      <d2a/>
      <d2b/>
      <d2c/>
    </d2>
  </d>
  <e/>
</r>

the wanted, correct result, is produced:

<c/>
<d>
   <d1/>
   <d2>
      <d2a/>
   </d2>
</d>

Explanation:

  1. The identity rule copies every matched node "as-is".

  2. There is a single overriding template matching any element.

  3. Inside this template two tests are made: whether the current node belongs to the set of all elements "following the start" and whether the current node belongs to the set of all elements "preceding the end". If so, the current node is passed to the identity template (copied), otherwise it is ignored (deleted).


II. XSLT 2.0 solution

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:param name="pStart" select="/*/b"/>
 <xsl:param name="pEnd" select="/*/d/d2/d2b"/>

  <xsl:variable name="vFollowingStart" select=
  "$pStart/following::* | $pStart/descendant::*"/>

 <xsl:variable name="vPrecedingEnd" select=
  "$pEnd/preceding::* | $pEnd/ancestor::*"/>

 <xsl:variable name="vWanted" select=
  "$vFollowingStart intersect $vPrecedingEnd"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*" name="identity">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="*[not(. intersect $vWanted)]">
  <xsl:apply-templates/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the XML file above, again the same correct result is produced.

Explanation: Use of the XPath 2.0 operator intersect.


III. XPath 1.0 solution, selecting just the nodes without altering the document:

For readability I am providing an XSLT transformation that outputs the result of selecting the wanted nodes. With the same purpose, sub-expressions are defined as variables:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:param name="pStart" select="/*/b"/>
 <xsl:param name="pEnd" select="/*/d/d2/d2b"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
  <xsl:variable name="vFollowingStart" select=
  "$pStart/following::* | $pStart/descendant::*"/>

 <xsl:variable name="vPrecedingEnd" select=
  "$pEnd/preceding::* | $pEnd/ancestor::*"/>

  <xsl:copy-of select=
   "$vFollowingStart
      [count(.|$vPrecedingEnd)
      =
       count($vPrecedingEnd)
      ]
   "/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied to the provided XML document (above), the wanted, selected nodes are output:

<c/>
<d>

   <d1/>

   <d2>

      <d2a/>

      <d2b/>

      <d2c/>

   </d2>

</d>
<d1/>
<d2>

   <d2a/>

   <d2b/>

   <d2c/>

</d2>
<d2a/>

Explanation: Here I use the Kayessian (by @Michael Kay) formula for the intersection of two node-sets $ns1 and $ns2:

$ns1[count(.|$ns2) = count($ns2)]

IV. Finally the Xpath 2.0 solution (corresponding to the XPath 1.0 solution):

I am again using an XSLT (2.0) transformation to copy the results to the output:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"
     xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
     xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
     <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

     <xsl:param name="pStart" select="/*/b"/>
     <xsl:param name="pEnd" select="/*/d/d2/d2b"/>

     <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
      <xsl:variable name="vFollowingStart" select=
      "$pStart/following::* | $pStart/descendant::*"/>

     <xsl:variable name="vPrecedingEnd" select=
      "$pEnd/preceding::* | $pEnd/ancestor::*"/>

      <xsl:sequence select=
       "$vFollowingStart intersect $vPrecedingEnd"/>
     </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

The same results (exactly the wanted nodes) as from the XPath 1.0 solution are produced:

<c/>
<d>
        <d1/>
        <d2>
               <d2a/>
               <d2b/>
               <d2c/>
        </d2>
    </d>
<d1/>
<d2>
            <d2a/>
            <d2b/>
            <d2c/>
</d2>
<d2a/>

UPDATE: Here is a XPath 1.0 solution for the "reasonably" question. Again it is expressed as XSLT stylesheet module, in which, for better readability, subexpressions are defined as separate variables:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:param name="pStart" select="/*/*/b"/>
 <xsl:param name="pEnd" select="/*/*/d/d2/d2b"/>

  <xsl:variable name="vFollowingStart" select=
  "$pStart/following::* | $pStart/descendant::*"/>

  <xsl:variable name="vcommonAncestor" select=
  "$pStart/ancestor::*
    [count(.|$pEnd/ancestor::*)
    =
     count($pEnd/ancestor::*)
    ][1]
    "/>
 <xsl:variable name="vEndHighestAncestor" select=
  "$vcommonAncestor/*
       [count($pEnd | descendant::*)
       =
        count(descendant::*)
       ]"/>

  <xsl:variable name="vPrecedingEnd" select=
  "$vEndHighestAncestor/preceding::*
  |
   $vEndHighestAncestor/ancestor::*"/>


 <xsl:template match="node()|@*" name="identity">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:copy-of select=
  "//*[count(.|$vFollowingStart) = count($vFollowingStart)
      and
       count(.|$vPrecedingEnd) = count($vPrecedingEnd)
      ]
  "/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the following XML document (the same as the provided, but wrapped into one more top element, and two children (g and h) added to c -- to make it more interesting:

<t>
<r>
  <a/><b/><c><g/><h/></c>
  <d>
    <d1/>
    <d2>
      <d2a/>
      <d2b/>
      <d2c/>
    </d2>
  </d>
  <e/>
</r>
</t>

the wanted, correct node-set is selected and copied to the output:

<c>
   <g/>
   <h/>
</c>
<g/>
<h/>

Explanation: This is almost the same as before, but we take as $pEnd its highest ancestor -- that is an immediate child of the common ancestor of $pStart and $pEnd.

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer for the first "Ideally" case. I suspected that selection only could not produce what I was describing. Nice that you included an XPath solution for those who might want it. Do you have an answer for the "Reasonably" case? (Find the node(s) between the ancestors of each endpoint that share a common parent.) –  Phrogz Oct 19 '11 at 16:01
    
@Phrogz: I thought the XSLT solution was what you needed, so I haven't looked into the less-challenging wish. Will do so, but after going home from work (where I just arrived). –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 19 '11 at 16:23
    
@Phrogz: If I understand your "reasonably" task, the selected nodes should be: c and d -- not only c. If my understanding isn't correct, please, explain. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 19 '11 at 16:28
    
Selecting between <b> and <e> would give <c> and <d>; selecting between <b> and <d> would give only <c>. For consistency, I'm suggesting that <d2b> should be treated as <d>, and thus only <c> would be selected. –  Phrogz Oct 19 '11 at 17:00
    
+1 good answer. –  LarsH Oct 19 '11 at 21:32

For your "reasonably" goal: Given the criteria "Start at b, stop at d2b", you can use the following XPath:

//b/following-sibling::*[following::d2b]

Since the following:: axis excludes descendants, this will select only following siblings of b up to the one that is an ancestor (or self) of d2b.

(I'm assuming there is only one <b> element in the document, as you seemed to assume.)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a good answer. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 20 '11 at 2:17
    
@_LarsH: Unfortunately your simple XPath expression only selects one element with the XML document in my Update, but three elements must be selected. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 20 '11 at 3:05
    
@Dimitre: I interpreted the specification differently, esp. "Selecting between <b> and <e> would give <c> and <d>; selecting between <b> and <d> would give only <c>. For consistency, I'm suggesting that <d2b> should be treated as <d>, and thus only <c> would be selected." I'll look to the @OP to referee whether I understood what he wanted correctly. If not, I'll be glad to know that. –  LarsH Oct 20 '11 at 11:07
    
Yes, The question is underspecified in this part. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 20 '11 at 12:12
1  
OK, I get it now. Using foo[following::bar] means "Match foo iff it has a bar following it", not "Match foo if it is following bar". That's a powerful axis I'd not seen before. Very nice, that will come in handy. Thanks! –  Phrogz Oct 20 '11 at 15:07

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