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Usually, a mention of checking the type of a variable at runtime results in a comment about bad design. Sometimes it seems like it can't be avoided. I would like to see examples of when runtime type checking is good design. I'd be especially interested in C++ or Java examples.

I recently asked a specific question involving this topic, but I wanted to ask the more general question. I saw this question: Is type checking ever OK? but it didn't really cover what I wanted to know.

Thanks in advance.

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closed as not constructive by littleadv, GWW, Mac, Andy Thomas-Cramer, Graviton Oct 19 '11 at 4:26

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possible duplicate of Is type checking ever OK? –  Andy Thomas Oct 19 '11 at 4:06
    
well, I noted that question didn't contain the info I was looking for, but you're right, it might be. –  user487100 Oct 19 '11 at 4:18

5 Answers 5

It's never good design. The problem with type checking is you are making assumptions about the type hierarchy which might not be true after further development of the software. For instance, if you conditionally perform some action based on whether or not the type of an object O is T, you're not accounting for the possibility of that same action being necessary for another type of object. If you use polymorphism properly you can avoid this problem.

(Putting it another way: if you perform different actions depending on the type of an object, you are assuming that the object can only be one of those certain types. It's easy for this assumption to be later rendered invalid. If you have lots of type-checking code, and you add a new type, you need to revise all that code; if you make use of polymorphism, you only need to edit the code in the one place - in the definition for the new type).

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What if you want to pass around objects implementing an interface via some communication system? If the objects being communicated are not logically related, or if they contain functionality that you can't access with polymorphism, how would you know how to use them? –  user487100 Oct 19 '11 at 3:56
    
I don't understand your question. Example? –  davmac Oct 19 '11 at 3:57
    
I've seen a few cases where the object is one of two primitive objects that have no relation to each other, and lots of cases where the base class could not have virtual methods added to it due to code ownership boundaries. –  Joshua Oct 19 '11 at 4:01
    
@Joshua, this is certainly a case where runtime type-checking is useful or even necessary, but it is certainly not good design. Such problems can also often be avoided by wrapping the relevant objects in a container over which you do have control. –  davmac Oct 19 '11 at 4:01
1  
@user487100: First question: if by being necessary it can't possibly be bad design then it can't be good design either - it's just the only possibility. 2nd question: via appropriate polymorphism. –  davmac Oct 19 '11 at 4:18

I think the primary concern people have with runtime type checking is that it can result in abominations like the following:

public class Animal { }

public class Dog extends Animal
{
    public void bark ( ) { /* play bark.wav */ }
}

public class Cat extends Animal
{
    public void meow ( ) { /* play meow.wav */ }
}

public class Main
{
    ...

    public void makeNoise (Animal animal)
    {
        if (animal instanceof Dog)
            ((Dog) animal).bark ( );
        else if (animal instanceof Cat)
            ((Cat) animal).meow ( );
    }

    ...
}

This should really be:

public interface Animal // or public abstract class Animal
{
    public void makeNoise ( );
}

public class Dog extends Animal
{
    public void makeNoise ( ) { /* play bark.wav */ }
}

public class Cat extends Animal
{
    public void makeNoise ( ) { /* play meow.wav */ }
}

public class Main
{
    ...

    public void makeNoise (Animal animal) // Probably actually refactored into caller...
    {
        animal.makeNoise ( );
    }

    ...
}

I think the issue is that it is ripe for abuse by noob programmers. Generally, where RTTI et. al. are employed, it might be a good sign that there is a similar kind of refactoring that could be used to make the code clearer. That said, it has it's uses and I'd never say that it is purely evil.

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... or this: ideone.com/8TUK2. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 19 '11 at 3:53
    
@R. Martinho Fernandes: true, in this simple case that works too. But what if I also have other behaviours too - that approach won't scale too well to many unique behaviours of each kind of Animal. –  Mac Oct 19 '11 at 3:58
    
As usual, it depends on what's being designed, and what tradeoffs you are willing to accept. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 19 '11 at 4:04
    
you are doing a factory, you can also use dependency injection. this example is tight coupled with DI, you can loose couple your entities. –  DarthVader Oct 19 '11 at 4:04

The only valid example I can think of is when being forced to use an inadequate third-party API.

For instance, imagine "Terrible Sub-Contractor" provides the following API:

public interface SharedMemorySpace {
    public void put(String s, Object o);
    public Object get(String s);
}

Now when using this API, one might "know" that the string "foo" is mapped to an instance of "Bar", but another party integrating into this might mistakenly also use "foo" to map to something else. This leaves two options:

  1. type check
  2. try/catch

In Java, since ClassCastException is a RuntimeException some would argue that you should not catch it. I think the choice between options is a matter of style. Either way, the only wrong choice would be to do nothing and blindly assume the type with an explicit cast.

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I've never heard of a large piece of software that didn't contain quite a few errors, in design as well as in coding.

So based on the assumption that there are errors in the code, I'm of the view that larger applications should contain a reasonable amount of code to check themselves, test that things are going ok, etc. (and do something sensible if not!)

This is subtly different from testing during build. Sometimes components can change after deployment so it's conceivable (depending on platform) that your code may suddenly get called with something that's not of quite the type it expected.

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I realise this is more for error catching than for behaviour, specifically. –  Colin Coghill Oct 19 '11 at 3:42
    
With this technique you could easily catch "errors" which didn't exist. It shouldn't be an error for a new type to be introduced. –  davmac Oct 19 '11 at 3:51
    
True, I guess it depends a bit on what you're doing. "do something sensible" might mean "tell programmer there's a new type XYZ, please add it to unit tests". Or if you've got a setup where you're often using new types, just ignore it. –  Colin Coghill Oct 19 '11 at 20:34

I dont think you should be checking a type. Your code and business process shouldnt depend on type checking and operating.

Dependency injection/inversion of control is really popular these days. and if you are using one of these frameworks. you can inject the types dynamically at the run time without type checking.

I have seen code that does type checking with some conditionals etc, this isnt the right way of doing things, you have the factory methods, polymorphism , inheritance. type checking should be the last resort.

In his precious book, Josh bloch mentions that instance of operator should be carefully. ie: for equals override etc. if you are doing business processing based on type checking at run time. that s bad.

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