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I have a client and a server both running in C. My task is to introduce java program in which I create a server to the C client and a client to the C server. I am successful in trying to get the connections set up properly. However the problem is in communicating the data between both C programs. Below is what I have written in my java program:

while(true){
while((userInput1=br1.readLine())!=null||(userInput2=br2.readLine())!=null){
   if(userInput1=!null){
      bw1.write(userInput1);
      bw1.flush();
   }
   if(userInput2=!null){
      bw2.write(userInput2);
      bw2.flush();
   }
}    

While debugging the above, it is seen that the execution is stuck at the second while statement meaning that the input stream is waiting for the input for the C client for ever. I am using BufferedReader and BufferedWriter for the streams. The C client and server are using send and recv functions to communicate. Kindly help with any inputs to make the java program help both the C programs communicate with each other as they do without this.

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I don't know much about Java networking, but it seems to me that the socket(s) used for the readers are blocking. You need to use non-blocking sockets. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 19 '11 at 6:34
    
You have two socket connections are you want the second connection block whenever the first connection is not sending data?? Is there any reason you are not using Threads so the socket connections can be read independantly. If there is a dependancy between the two connections could you say what it is? –  Peter Lawrey Oct 19 '11 at 7:26

3 Answers 3

Have you correctly considered the effect of Java's "short circuit" or operator?

With || if the first clause is true the second is never evaluated.

   while(
        (userInput1=br1.readLine())!=null ||
        (userInput2=br2.readLine())!=null) {

So you successfully read

 userInput1=br1.readLine())!=null

and immediately enter your processing, then come back to while and read the next line into userInput1 again. Hence userInput2 never will receive a value.

You need separate logic like

    read first line
    read second line 

But exactly what should you do when reading line2 and a the data is not ready? Try again? Is the line you read next the expected line2 or a new line1? This is quite tricky to get right.

I would prefer not to rely on two separate readlines in my protocol.

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I have used || operator keeping in view that at one time only either the client or the server will be ready to give input while the other waits for that input or involve in some operations of its own. so every time the while loop starts, any one of the conditions should hold true (input will be given at client or server side) and accordingly that input should be written to the corresponding output stream. –  abhiram Oct 19 '11 at 7:23
    
and lemme bring to your notice also that while the execution is stuck at the second while statement, if I terminate the C client program the input that is already given is now written to the output stream of the server and the server starts responding to that input i.e., only when the client program ends does this realize that it has reached the end of the buffer. Any inputs please? –  abhiram Oct 19 '11 at 7:24
    
So you have code mixing the client and server sides? Sorry didn't realise that. To my taste that's not a clean design. –  djna Oct 19 '11 at 7:32
    
So do u recommend having 2 separate java programs written, one to act as client to the actual C server and the other as server to the actual C client. And then to establish connection between this client-server duo. I am sorry if I appear as overusing people here. I am only in the process of learning.. Please advise.. –  abhiram Oct 19 '11 at 8:43
    
Yes, separate client and server programs, or at the very least separate methods for dealing with client side and server side. I claim that your code will be more easily understood by separating concerns. –  djna Oct 21 '11 at 8:57
while((userInput1=br1.readLine())!=null||(userInput2=br2.readLine())!=null){

This condition means that you are going to read br1 all the way to EOS before you ever read anything from br2. Is that what you really intended?

Conversely, if you are stuck at br2.readLine() it means two things: (a) br1 is at EOS, and (b) the peer associated with br2 hasn't sent anything, or at least hasn't sent a line terminated by a newline.

Are you perhaps suffering from the common delusion that readLine() returns null when there is no data ready to be read?

Also you are reading lines terminated by newlines, which are removed by the readLine() call, and then writing them out without any newlines, which can hardly be correct.

It appears to me that what you are really writing is a proxy, in which case you need two threads per socket, one reading from A and writing to B, and the other reading from B and writing to A. And if it's a proxy you should use InputStreams and OutputStreams rather than Readers and Writers, as you probably have no reason to inspect the data, and you therefore shouldn't put it through the byte->char and char->byte conversion processes implied by using Readers and Writers. There are further subtleties when writing proxies but I'll wait for your confirmation before elucidating them.

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I have 2 threads doing the job just fine now. I used br1.ready() and br2.ready() to know if there is any data in the streams. And also used a technique to add a parity character in the original communicating programs to send the data through my proxy. I am now reading the data till I encounter this parity and sending it to the other side of the communicating part. This seems to work fine. And yes, I still continue to use InputStreamReader and OutputStreamWriter. Please do enlighten me if there is a better way to handle this. Thanks. –  abhiram Oct 25 '11 at 6:09
    
@abhiram Don't use ready(). You have two threads. Block. What else are the threads going to do anyway? And you should only use Readers and Writers if you know the data is character data only. If there is any present future or remote possibility of it being binary, use Streams: in other words, use streams. I don't know why you need this parity thing for when you're only mediating between a client and a server, i.e. you are a proxy. Just copy the bytes in both directions. –  EJP Oct 25 '11 at 7:02

the reason I am using the parity character is to interpret the end of the stream. Otherwise using using just the read() is making the program halt for the input forever (even after the actual had sent all its data). Am using the ready() in the following way:

//The proxy client
while(true){
    if(br1.ready()){
        while((temp1=br1.read())!=(int)par)
            userInput1=userInput1+(char)temp1;
        System.out.println("Input to Actual Server: " + userInput1);
        bw1.write(userInput1);
        bw1.flush();
        System.out.flush();
        userInput1="";
        temp1=0;
        }
        if(br2.ready()){
            while((temp2=br2.read())!=(int)par)
                userInput2=userInput2+(char)temp2;
            System.out.println("Response from Actual Server: " + userInput2);
            userInput2=userInput2+par;
            bw2.write(userInput2);
            bw2.flush();
            System.out.flush();
            userInput2="";
            temp2=0;
        }
}

//The proxy server
while(true){
     if(br1.ready()){
         while((temp1=br1.read())!=(int)par)
                         userInput1=userInput1+(char)temp1;
         System.out.println("Input from Actual Client: " + userInput1);
         userInput1=userInput1+par;
         bw1.write(userInput1);
         bw1.flush();
         System.out.flush();
         userInput1="";
         temp1=0;
     }
     if(br2.ready()){
         while((temp2=br2.read())!=(int)par)
                userInput2=userInput2+(char)temp2;
         System.out.println("Response to Actual Client: " + userInput2);
         bw2.write(userInput2);
         bw2.flush();
         System.out.flush();
         userInput2="";
         temp2=0;
     }
}

Kindly suggest if there is any problem of using ready().

share|improve this answer
    
alright, I have made a few changes to the above. Used available() method in the BuffereInputStream to know if there is still data in the stream and thereby not needing to using a parity character. The need to use ready() is no more there. –  abhiram Oct 27 '11 at 12:46

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