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I have a C# program and the following (novice I suppose) problem:

namespace ObjectReference
{
    public class A<TypeC>
    {
        public B b;

        public void MethodA()
        {
            b = new B(this);
        }
    }
}

and in a different file in the same project:

namespace ObjectReference    
{    
    public class B    
    {   
        public A<TypeC> a;

        public B(A<TypeC> myObjA)    
        {    
            a = myObjA;   
        }
    }    
}

In the file where class A is defined I get this error on line "b = new B(this);": "Argument 1: cannot convert from 'ObjectReference.A<TypeC>' to 'ObjectReference.A<ObjectReference.TypeC>'".

I've tried everything, I can't solve this and I don't understand why it shows up, all the classes are defined inside the same namespace ObjectReference (that is classes A, B and TypeC). It's like in class A it considers the type of the class to be ObjectReference.A<TypeC>, whereas in class B it considers the type to be ObjectReference.A<ObjectReference.TypeC>.

Please advise.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Is everything in the same assembly? –  Henk Holterman Oct 19 '11 at 10:07
    
Show the declaration of TypeC. Du you have any using statements in your files? Seems like there are two definitions of TypeC. –  Jan Oct 19 '11 at 10:08

4 Answers 4

What you're writing is the equivalent of this:

public class A<T>
{
    public B b;

    public void MethodA()
    {
        b = new B(this);
    }
}

public class B    
{   
    public A<TypeC> a;

    public B(A<TypeC> myObjA)    
    {    
        a = myObjA;   
    }
} 

Notice that I've written class A as A<T> rather than A<TypeC>. Even though you've put a valid type name it's a legal C# generic type so within the definition of the class A TypeC isn't the same as the class TypeC. Hence the error message you're getting.

To make this work you need to do something like this:

public class A<T>
{
    public B<T> b;

    public void MethodA()
    {
        b = new B<T>(this);
    }
}

public class B<T> 
{   
    public A<T> a;

    public B(A<T> myObjA)    
    {    
        a = myObjA;   
    }
}    

Then you can call the code like so:

var a = new A<TypeC>();
a.MethodA();

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
great answer, solved my problem –  laailalalaa Oct 19 '11 at 10:37

You are trying to tell class B to have a constructor accepting an instance of type A without any type specification. You can either update class B accepting a type parameter just like class A:

public class B<T>
{
    ...
} 

or you can make the constructor of Class b more concrete specifying the type parameter for him like:

public B(A<string> myObjA)
{
    a = myObjA;
} 

For more information about this type parameter, i suggest you look up some information about generics. There are tons of books and articles out there!

edit

I see you updated the code. This still wont be sufficient unless TypeC is an actual type which you havent given us. This however would be a very difficult to understand naming scenario. Basically in class A you define a generic type parameter that can be specified under the name TypeC and in class B you assume a type with this name exists. I still recommend you doing some reading on generics.

share|improve this answer
    
Here is TypeC, defined, like I said, in the same project, same namespace, in a different file: namespace ObjectReference { public class TypeC { public string stringC; public TypeC() { stringC = "stringC"; } } } So I do specify the type parameter in the constructor in class B. The snippet I gave here is a simplified version of my actual code, but this is the problem I need to handle. I will do extensive reading on generics, however I hoped someone had an idea on how to solve this. Thanks –  laailalalaa Oct 19 '11 at 10:19
    
@laail : Please add this info to your question and format it properly. –  Henk Holterman Oct 19 '11 at 11:16

You are trying to pass a generic implementation of A into a constructor of B that takes a non-generic implentation of A. This unfortunatly does not work and will require some rewriting of the class B.

What would work however would be something like:

namespace ObjectReference
{
    public class B<TypeC>
    {
        public A<TypeC> a;

        public B(A<TypeC> myObjA) 
        {
            a = myObjA;
        }
    }
 }

and then call it as:

b = new B<TypeC>(this);
share|improve this answer
    
does the trick, and thanks for the explanation –  laailalalaa Oct 19 '11 at 10:37

A<TypeC> is a so called open generic type which you cannot pass as method argument.

To fix this you need to make B generic too. Using A<TypeC> within B<TypeC> now makes A<TypeC> a constructed open generic type. This just means that the generic type parameter of B is "derived" to A<TypeC>.

You might want to have a look at the MSDN page about generic classes in C#.

namespace ObjectReference    
{    
    public class B<TypeC>    
    {   
        public A<TypeC> a;

        public B(A<TypeC> myObjA)    
        {    
            a = myObjA;   
        }
    }    
}
share|improve this answer
    
Does the trick, thanks for the explanation and reference. –  laailalalaa Oct 19 '11 at 10:37

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