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#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
using namespace std;

void input(int(&x)[10]);
int copy(int (&x)[10], int(&y)[10]);
void read(int(&x)[10], int b);


int main()
{
    int m[10], v[10], c; 
    input((&m)[10]);
    read((&m)[10], 10);
    c = copy((&m)[10], (&v)[10]);
    read((&v)[c],c);
    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

void input(int(&x)[10])
{
    for(int i=0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        cout<<"enter number "<<i+1<<": ";
        cin>>x[i];
    }
}

void read(int(&x)[10], int b)
{
    for(int i=0; i < b; i++)
    {
        cout<<"number("<<i+1<<"): "<<x[i];
    }
}

int copy(int(&x)[10], int(&y)[10])
{
    int c = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        if(x[i] % 3 == 0)
        {
            y[c]=x[i];
            c++;
        }
    }
    return c;
}

I get a runtime error when i input the first number, any help will be appreciated I think the problem is in the way i pass the arrays to the functions but I am not really sure the aim of the program is to get input for 10 int-s in the array m, than transfer those divisible by 3 to v, and output both

share|improve this question
    
What error you are getting? –  Sai Kalyan Kumar Akshinthala Oct 19 '11 at 10:24
    
@skk: Irrelevant in this case, because the program could cause anything to happen, including opening a micro black hole in your eyeball. –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Oct 19 '11 at 10:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The syntax of passing an array is not correct (though it compiles). It should be as simple as,

input(m);
read(m, 10);
c = copy(m, v);
read(v, c);

int(&x)[10] should be used for the function prototype where you are receiving an array of size 10 by reference. While calling the function simply pass the name of the variable.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Correct, and as simple as.. it is. ;-) –  Nawaz Oct 19 '11 at 10:29
    
However, it's interesting that OP's code compiles, if kept as it is. I never knew that. –  iammilind Oct 19 '11 at 10:32
3  
@iammilind: (&m)[10] is the tenth element of an array of arrays, and so has the correct type for the function. –  Mike Seymour Oct 19 '11 at 10:34
    
@MikeSeymour, yes I saw your answer. But then what is the difference between m[10] and (&m)[10], if both are 10th element. Does the later syntax creates a reference ? Can we create reference like that ? –  iammilind Oct 19 '11 at 10:36
    
@iammilind: It is not the case that both are the 10th element of m. Read Mike's answer again! &m is an int(*)[10] which, as far as this type knows, points to one or more arrays of 10 ints each. The OP has only one but with (&m)[10] he's trying to pass a reference to the mythical 10th such array of 10 ints. That's why it compiles; m[10] would not as the function does not accept an int. –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Oct 19 '11 at 10:38
input((&m)[10]);

This doesn't do what you think it does; &m is a pointer to an array, so (&m)[10] is a reference to the 10th element of an array of arrays; in other words, to an invalid block of memory some distance off the end of m.

You want input(m); to pass a reference to m.

share|improve this answer

You are passing pointers to the functions, not references.

input((&m)[10]);

In the line above, the & is getting the address of m, and making it into a pointer. The functions are not expecting pointers. Skip the & in the calls, and it should work.

Also, I suggest you try to find a tutorial describing the difference between a pointer and a reference. A quick Google search turned up this question here on Stack Overflow, with some good answers.

share|improve this answer

void input(int(&x)[10])

In this function signature:

  • x is the argument name
  • int(&)[10] is the argument type (reference to an array of 10 ints).

Now consider how you've called this function, presumably by copy/paste:

input((&m)[10]);

With any function call, you write just the name of a variable, not its type; so, when you're passing the array to the function, you should just write:

input(m);

(At present you're passing something else that does not exist in memory, because of &'s triple meaning.)

Same goes for the other places where you pass [references to] arrays.

share|improve this answer

Expanding on the answer above: m[10] is past the last element in the array so what happens is you are reading memory outside your variables which is generally considered to be bad form.

share|improve this answer
    
The OP did not write m[10]. –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Oct 19 '11 at 10:36

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