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I'm experiencing big differences in timeperformance in my query, and it seems the order of which the joins (inner and left outer) occur in the query makes all the difference. Are there some "ground rules" in what order joins should be in?

Both of them are part of a bigger query. The difference between them is that the left join is placed last in the faster query.

Slow query: (> 10 minutes)

SELECT [t0].[Ref], [t1].[Key], [t1].[Name],  
    (CASE 
        WHEN [t3].[test] IS NULL THEN CONVERT(NVarChar(250),@p0)
        ELSE CONVERT(NVarChar(250),[t3].[Key])
     END) AS [value], 
    (CASE 
        WHEN 0 = 1 THEN CONVERT(NVarChar(250),@p1)
        ELSE CONVERT(NVarChar(250),[t4].[Key])
     END) AS [value2]

FROM [dbo].[tblA] AS [t0]
INNER JOIN [dbo].[tblB] AS [t1] ON [t0].[RefB] = [t1].[Ref]

LEFT OUTER JOIN (
    SELECT 1 AS [test], [t2].[Ref], [t2].[Key]
    FROM [dbo].[tblC] AS [t2]
    ) AS [t3] ON [t0].[RefC] = ([t3].[Ref])

INNER JOIN [dbo].[tblD] AS [t4] ON [t0].[RefD] = ([t4].[Ref])

Faster query: (~ 30 seconds)

SELECT [t0].[Ref], [t1].[Key], [t1].[Name],  
    (CASE 
        WHEN [t3].[test] IS NULL THEN CONVERT(NVarChar(250),@p0)
        ELSE CONVERT(NVarChar(250),[t3].[Key])
     END) AS [value], 
    (CASE 
        WHEN 0 = 1 THEN CONVERT(NVarChar(250),@p1)
        ELSE CONVERT(NVarChar(250),[t4].[Key])
     END) AS [value2]

FROM [dbo].[tblA] AS [t0]
INNER JOIN [dbo].[tblB] AS [t1] ON [t0].[RefB] = [t1].[Ref]

INNER JOIN [dbo].[tblD] AS [t4] ON [t0].[RefD] = ([t4].[Ref])

LEFT OUTER JOIN (
    SELECT 1 AS [test], [t2].[Ref], [t2].[Key]
    FROM [dbo].[tblC] AS [t2]
    ) AS [t3] ON [t0].[RefC] = ([t3].[Ref])
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Query performance optimisation tends to vary between flavours of SQL. Is this SQLServer, or is it another type of SQL (MySQL, PostgresQL, etc)? –  Mark Bannister Oct 19 '11 at 11:02
    
It is SQLServer –  hightow Oct 19 '11 at 11:16
    
You might find that you have a parameter sniffing issue. Altering the text would mean that the same cached plan wouldn't get used. –  Martin Smith Oct 19 '11 at 11:24
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3 Answers

Generally INNER JOIN order won't matter because inner joins are commutative and associative. In both cases, you still have t0 inner join t4 so should make no difference.

Re-phrasing that, SQL is declarative: you say "what you want", not "how". The optimiser works the "how" and will re-order JOINs as needed, looking as WHEREs etc too in practice.

In complex queries, a cost based query optimiser won't exhaust all permutation so it could matter occasionally.

So, I'd check for these:

  • You said these are part of a bigger query, so this section matters less because the whole query matters.
  • Complexity can be hidden using views too if any of the tables are actually views
  • Is this repeatable, no matter what order code runs in?
  • What are the query plan differences?

See some other SO questions:

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If u have more than 2 tables it is important to order table joins. It can make big differences. First table should get a leading hint. First table is that object with most selective rows. For example: If u have a member table with 1.000.000 people and you only want to select female gender and it is first table, so you only join 500.000 records to next table. If this table is at the end of join order (maybe table 4,5 or 6) then each record (worst case 1.000.000) will be joined. This includes inner and outer joins.

The Rule: Start with most selective table, then join next logical most selective table.

Converting functions and beautifying should do last. Sometimes it is better to bundle the shole SQL in brackets and use expressions and functions in outer select statements.

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At least in SQLite, I found out that it makes a huge difference. Actually it didn't need to be a very complex query for the difference to show itself. My JOIN statements were inside an embedded clause however.

Basically, you should start with the most specific limitations first, as Christian has pointed out.

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