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First of all, My English is poor. Please understand me.

My small project is concurrently Checking several server statuses with C# .NET.

My Question is; do I have to make several Timer and operate each of them with Thread.start() or do I have to make Several Thread and each Thread should operate Timer.start() ?

If both of two are not a proper method, please teach me how to do this..
Examples are always welcome.

Thanks in advance.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you use System.Threading.Timer, it will take care of the threading for you. From the documentation:

Use a TimerCallback delegate to specify the method you want the Timer to execute. The timer delegate is specified when the timer is constructed, and cannot be changed. The method does not execute on the thread that created the timer; it executes on a ThreadPool thread supplied by the system.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.timer.aspx

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the invoked function from Timer is also Thread handled? –  Sungguk Lim Oct 19 '11 at 12:26
    
Like the documentation says: "The method does not execute on the thread that created the timer; it executes on a ThreadPool thread supplied by the system". You'll set up your timers and the callbacks will be executed on separate threads from the ThreadPool. –  Bergius Oct 19 '11 at 14:06

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