Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm following the Stanford Database course and there's a question where we have Find all pizzerias that serve every pizza eaten by people over 30 using Relational Algebra only.

The problem consist of a small database with four relations:

Person(name, age, gender)       // name is a key
Frequents(name, pizzeria)       // [name,pizzeria] is a key
Eats(name, pizza)               // [name,pizza] is a key
Serves(pizzeria, pizza, price)  // [pizzeria,pizza] is a key

I know how to find which pizza's people over 30 eat and make a cross-product of them, so I could check which pizzeria has both.

I can make a list of all the pizzeria's that serve those pizza's, but I have no idea how to remove any pizzeria that only have one combination (like Dominos).

Chicago Pizza   cheese  cheese
Chicago Pizza   cheese  supreme
Chicago Pizza   supreme cheese
Chicago Pizza   supreme supreme
Dominos         cheese  cheese
Dominos         cheese  supreme

The Q&A forums tell us to use division and point us to several presentations. While I get what the result of the action would be, I don't really understand how to translate the formula's into relational algebra syntax.

Could anyone explain me what I'm missing, hopefully without giving the solution outright?

share|improve this question
    
This question gets asked fairly frequently. See stackoverflow.com/questions/7731877/… The details you are asking about are in my answer to that question. –  Erwin Smout Oct 19 '11 at 18:16
    
I don't know, but your answer wasn't very helpful. I had problems translating my own data into a division query, so sending me to yet another example that's completely unrelated didn't help me solve it –  Ivo Flipse Oct 24 '11 at 20:33

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The solution is the join div operator http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relational_algebra#Division_.28.C3.B7.29

See http://oracletoday.blogspot.com/2008/04/relational-algebra-division-in-sql.html

share|improve this answer
    
Oh wow, finally an example that even uses relational algebra as well! –  Ivo Flipse Oct 28 '11 at 7:45
  1. On slide 6, note that n is (3 1 7).

  2. On the next slide, o / n results in (4 8).

  3. If o would also have (12 3) and (12 1) but not (12 7), 12 would not be part of o / n.

You should be able to fill in an example in the formula on Slide 16 and work it out.

  1. In your case, we take ɑ to be:

    Chicago Pizza   cheese  cheese
    Chicago Pizza   cheese  supreme
    Chicago Pizza   supreme cheese
    Chicago Pizza   supreme supreme
    Dominos         cheese  cheese
    Dominos         cheese  supreme
    
  2. Then we take β to be:

    cheese cheese
    cheese supreme
    supreme cheese
    supreme supreme
    
  3. The result of ɑ / β would then be:

    Chicago Pizza
    

Dominos is not part of this because it misses (supreme cheese) and (supreme supreme).

share|improve this answer
    
If that would be alpha, then what would be the projection of A-B of alpha be (see slide 18)? I'm still having some difficulties translating that formula into something concrete –  Ivo Flipse Oct 19 '11 at 16:02
    
@IvoFlipse: The slide says Compute all possible attribute pairings for that projection. –  Tom Wijsman Oct 19 '11 at 16:39

Definitely this is the concept of division operator in relational algebra.

But I tried on that course. The RA Relational Algebra Syntax doesn't support dev operator. So I used diff and cross instead. Here is my solution:

\project_{pizzeria}(Serves)
\diff
\project_{pizzeria}(
    (\project_{pizzeria}(Serves) 
    \cross 
    \project_{pizza}(\project_{name}(\select_{age>30}(Person))\join Eats))
    \diff
    \project_{pizzeria,pizza}(Serves)
)
share|improve this answer

Try doing a join using conditions rather than a cross. The conditions would be sure that you match up the records correctly (you only include them if they are in both relations) rather than matching every record in the first relation to every record in the second relation.

share|improve this answer

Based on the assumption that all pizzerias serve at least one type of pizza, we will find that the group of pizzas that people over 30 do NOT EAT will be sold by all the pizzerias EXCEPT the one(s) who sell exclusively pizzas which people over 30 do EAT. Did it help?

share|improve this answer
    
No not really, because I didn't grasp how to express that in relational algebra. But luckily the other answers helped me solve it :-) –  Ivo Flipse Nov 9 '11 at 6:30

Here is the conversion of http://oracletoday.blogspot.com/2008/04/relational-algebra-division-in-sql.html to MySQL


    mysql>create table parts (pid integer);
    mysql>create table catalog (sid integer,pid integer);
    mysql>insert into parts values ( 1), (2), (3), (4), (5);
    mysql>insert into catalog values (10,1);

mysql>select * from catalog;
+------+------+
| sid  | pid  |
+------+------+
|   10 |    1 |
|    1 |    1 |
|    1 |    2 |
|    1 |    3 |
|    1 |    4 |
|    1 |    5 |
+------+------+


mysql> select distict sid,pid from (select sid from catalog) a  join parts;
+------+------+
| sid  | pid  |
+------+------+
|   10 |    1 |
|   10 |    2 |
|   10 |    3 |
|   10 |    4 |
|   10 |    5 |
|    1 |    1 |
|    1 |    2 |
|    1 |    3 |
|    1 |    4 |
|    1 |    5 |
+------+------+


mysql>select * from 
(select distinct sid,pid from (select sid from catalog) a ,parts)  b where
not exists (select 1 from catalog c where b.sid = c.sid and b.pid = c.pid);

+------+------+
| sid  | pid  |
+------+------+
|   10 |    2 |
|   10 |    3 |
|   10 |    4 |
|   10 |    5 |
+------+------+


mysql>select distinct sid from catalog c1
where not exists (
   select null from parts p
   where not exists (select null from catalog where pid=p.pid and c1.sid=sid));
+------+
| sid  |
+------+
|    1 |
+------+

share|improve this answer

I figured out below based on wiki.

R:= \project_{pizzeria, pizza} (\select_{age>30} (Person \join Eats \join Serves))

S:= \project_{pizza} (\select_{age>30} (Person \join Eats \join Serves))

Final solution:

\project_{pizzeria} (\project_{pizzeria, pizza} (\select_{age>30} (Person \join Eats \join Serves)))

\diff

( \project_{pizzeria} ( ( \project_{pizzeria} (\project_{pizzeria, pizza} (\select_{age>30} (Person \join Eats \join Serves))) \cross \project_{pizza} (\select_{age>30} (Person \join Eats \join Serves)) ) \diff ( \project_{pizzeria, pizza} (\select_{age>30} (Person \join Eats \join Serves)) ) ) )

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.