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I'm using Mahout's EuclideanDistanceSimilarity class to rank the similarity of several users given the following data set of user preferences. The range for preferences is currently all integers from 1 to 5 inclusive. However I have control over the scale, so that can change if it would help.

User    Preferences:
        Item 1    Item 2    Item 3    Item 4    Item 5    Item 6
 1       2         4         3         5         1         2
 2       5         1         5         1         5         1
 3       1         5         1         5         1         5
 4       2         4         3         5         1         2
 5       3         3         4         5         2         2

I'm getting unexpected results when I run the following test code, which I added to the Test class found here: http://www.massapi.com/source/mahout-distribution-0.4/core/src/test/java/org/apache/mahout/cf/taste/impl/similarity/EuclideanDistanceSimilarityTest.java.html

@Test
public void testSimple2() throws Exception {
    DataModel dataModel = getDataModel(
            new long[]{1, 2, 3, 4, 5},
            new Double[][]{
                {2.0, 4.0, 3.0, 5.0, 1.0, 2.0},
                {5.0, 1.0, 5.0, 1.0, 5.0, 1.0},
                {1.0, 5.0, 1.0, 5.0, 1.0, 5.0},
                {2.0, 4.0, 3.0, 5.0, 1.0, 2.0},
                {3.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, 2.0, 2.0},});
    for (int i = 1; i <= 5; i++) {
        for (int j = 1; j <= 5; j++) {
            System.out.println( i + "," + j + ": " + new EuclideanDistanceSimilarity(dataModel).userSimilarity(i, j));
        }
    }
}

It produces the following results:

1,1: 1.0
1,2: 0.7129109430106292
1,3: 1.0
1,4: 1.0
1,5: 1.0
2,1: 0.7129109430106292
2,2: 1.0
2,3: 0.5556605665978556
2,4: 0.7129109430106292
2,5: 0.8675434911352263
3,1: 1.0
3,2: 0.5556605665978556
3,3: 1.0
3,4: 1.0
3,5: 0.9683428667784535
4,1: 1.0
4,2: 0.7129109430106292
4,3: 1.0
4,4: 1.0
4,5: 1.0
5,1: 1.0
5,2: 0.8675434911352263
5,3: 0.9683428667784535
5,4: 1.0
5,5: 1.0

Would someone please help me understand what I'm doing wrong here? Clearly, user 1's preferences are not identical to users 3 & 5, so why do I get 1.0 for the similarity?

I'm open to using a different algorithm if Euclidean won't work, however Pearson doesn't work for me because I need to handle users that submit identical preferences for each item and I do not want to correct for "grade inflation."

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1 Answer 1

It is a little weird but I can explain what's happening.

The Euclidean distance d can't be used as a similarity metric directly since it gets bigger with "less similarity". You could use 1/d, but then perfect matches result in infinity, not 1. You can use 1/(1+d).

The problem is that the distance can only be calculated over dimensions that both users have in common. More dimensions typically means more distance. So it's penalizing overlap, the opposite of what you'd expect.

So the formula is really n/(1+d), where n is the number of dimensions of overlap. That results in a similarity greater than 1, which is capped back to 1, in some cases.

n is not the right factor. It's an old simple kludge. I will ask on the mailing list about the right-er expression. For large data, this tends to work OK though.

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Variations in overlap shouldn't be an issue, we are trying to match users by their answers to several required profile questions, so every users should have preferences for exactly the same set of "items." On another note, the javadocs for EuclideanDistanceSimilarity (javasourcecode.org/html/open-source/mahout/mahout-0.5/…) say that "The similarity is then computed as 1 / (1 + distance), so the resulting values are in the range (0,1]," so if n = 1, similarities greater than 1 shouldn't be possible right? –  10GritSandpaper Oct 19 '11 at 15:08
    
The doc is wrong actually, and as a result the value can be > 1, so is capped. I think a factor of more like sqrt(n) is appropriate. Variation doesn't come into play here, yes; I'm just explaining why you see such apparently high 1.0 similarities. –  Sean Owen Oct 19 '11 at 17:03
    
Thank you, that explains it. So the probability of the similarity exceeding 1.0 increases with the ratio of the number of dimensions to the preference range. I've done a couple tests increasing the preference values uniformly by factors of ten and 100; and this seems to pan out. I'm only getting 1.0 for identical matches now. If that's the case, then I should be able to solve my problem by expanding the preference range. Does that seem correct? –  10GritSandpaper Oct 19 '11 at 19:21
    
It does, though I'm going to change the metric probably further after talking with people who know better. That's an old heuristic that needed replacing. For example it seems like 1/(1+d/sqrt(n)) might be best of all. Then it would never exceed 1. –  Sean Owen Oct 19 '11 at 19:55
    
PS I committed my change to Mahout today. –  Sean Owen Oct 21 '11 at 19:22

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