Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want my application to be able to use more than 2GB memory, I googled around and found that the IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE command lets me do that.

So I added

{$SetPEFlags IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE}

To my program's .dpr file, after all the uses and the {$R *.res} line,

but when I compile, I get the error:

E2003 Undeclared identifier: 'IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE'

What am I doing wrong?

Also, on Windows 7 64bit, do I need to mess around with boot settings for this command to work, or just compile a 32bit application with the command and it will do everything else automatically?

Thanks

share|improve this question
8  
add uses Windows –  Premature Optimization Oct 19 '11 at 14:27
1  
Thanks, that worked! –  KingOfKong Oct 19 '11 at 14:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Also, on Windows 7 64bit, do I need to mess around with boot settings for this command to work, or just compile a 32bit application with the command and it will do everything else automatically?

64-bit Windows will provide 4 GB address space automatically, without boot tweaks.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/bb613473%28v=vs.85%29.aspx:

To enable an application to use the larger address space, set the IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE flag in the image header. The linker included with Microsoft Visual C++ supports the /LARGEADDRESSAWARE switch to set this flag. Setting this flag and then running the application on a system that does not have 4GT support should not affect the application.

On 64-bit editions of Windows, 32-bit applications marked with the IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE flag have 4 GB of address space available.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.