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Say I have some ranges represented by start coordinates start<-c(1,2,3) and end coordiantes end<-c(4,5,4) ;ranges<-data.frame(start,end) How can I split this up into one length intervals? i.e. I want

this

   starts ends
1      1    4
2      2    5
3      3    4  

to be transformed into this:

   starts ends
1      1    2      |
2      3    4     <-end of original first interval
3      2    3      |
4      4    5     <-end of original second interval
5      3    4     <-end of original third interval

right now I have a for loop iterating through the list and creating a sequence sequence that goes from start to end but this loop takes a very long time to execute for long lists of ranges.

share|improve this question
    
...why don't you post your code, it might be a small detail that makes all the difference in speed... –  Tommy Oct 19 '11 at 15:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could try creating text for the vectors, parse-ing and eval-uating and then using a matrix to create the data.frame:

txt <- paste("c(",paste(ranges$start,ranges$end,sep=":",collapse=","),")",sep="")

> txt
[1] "c(1:4,2:5,3:4)"

vec <- eval(parse(text=txt))
> vec
 [1] 1 2 3 4 2 3 4 5 3 4

mat <- matrix(vec,ncol=2,byrow=T)
> data.frame(mat)
  X1 X2
1  1  2
2  3  4
3  2  3
4  4  5
5  3  4
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for innovative thinking! This takes 0.94 secs on my machine compared to my solution's 1.6 secs... –  Tommy Oct 19 '11 at 16:01
    
excellent! do you know if completing a parse takes less time than a loop? EDIT: @Tommy thanks for confirming it doe –  CAPSLOCK Oct 19 '11 at 16:02
    
For the record, I don't think this fortune about using parse applies here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4339077/… ...but I tend to try to use do.call instead to avoid that issue. –  Tommy Oct 19 '11 at 18:27

Here's one way. It's a "glorified for-loop" in the disguise of lapply on a sequence.

# Your sample data
ranges<-data.frame(start=c(1,2,3),end=c(4,5,4))

# Extract the start/end columns         
start <- ranges$start
end <- ranges$end
# Calculate result data
res <- lapply(seq_along(start), function(i) start[i]+seq(0, end[i]-start[i]))
# Make it into a data.frame by way of a matrix (which has a byrow argument)
newRanges <- as.data.frame( matrix(unlist(res), ncol=2, byrow=TRUE, dimnames=list(NULL, names(ranges))) )

Which gives the correct result:

> newRanges
  start end
1     1   2
2     3   4
3     2   3
4     4   5
5     3   4

And then time it on a bigger problem:

n <- 1e5
start <- sample(10, n, replace=TRUE)
end <- start + sample( 3, n, replace=TRUE)*2-1
system.time( newRanges <- as.data.frame( matrix(unlist(lapply(seq_along(start), function(i) start[i]+seq(0, end[i]-start[i]))), ncol=2, byrow=TRUE) ) )

This takes about 1.6 seconds on my machine. Good enough?

...The trick is to work on the vectors directly instead of on the data.frame. And then build the data.frame at the end.

Update @Ellipsis... commented that lapply is no better than a for-loop. Let's see:

system.time( a <- unlist(lapply(seq_along(start), function(i) start[i]+seq(0, end[i]-start[i]))) ) # 1.6 secs

system.time( b <- {
  res <- vector('list', length(start))
  for (i in seq_along(start)) {   
    res[[i]] <- start[i]+seq(0, end[i]-start[i])
  }
  unlist(res) 
}) # 1.8 secs

So, not only is the for-loop about 12% slower in this case, it is also much more verbose...

UPDATE AGAIN!

@Martin Morgan suggested using Map, and it is indeed the fastest solution yet - faster than do.call in my other answer. Also, by using seq.int my first solution is also much faster:

# do.call solution: 0.46 secs 
system.time( matrix(do.call('c', lapply(seq_along(start), function(i) call(':', start[i], end[i]))), ncol=2, byrow=TRUE) )

# lapply solution: 0.42 secs   
system.time( matrix(unlist(lapply(seq_along(start), function(i) start[[i]]+seq.int(0L, end[[i]]-start[[i]]))), ncol=2, byrow=TRUE) )

# Map solution: 0.26 secs   
system.time( matrix(unlist(Map(seq.int, start, end)), ncol=2, byrow=TRUE) )
share|improve this answer
    
lapply is no better than a for loop –  CAPSLOCK Oct 19 '11 at 15:20
    
@Ellipsis... See my updated answer. –  Tommy Oct 19 '11 at 15:57
1  
Maybe Map(seq, start, end) instead of lapply, or with(ranges, Map(seq, start, end)) to avoid explicit extraction of starts and ends. –  Martin Morgan Oct 19 '11 at 21:43
    
@MartinMorgan - Excellent idea! Map is indeed faster than lapply here (around 20% faster). –  Tommy Oct 19 '11 at 21:49
1  
try seq.int for speed, with USE.NAMES=FALSE for Map –  Martin Morgan Oct 19 '11 at 22:24

Here's another answer based on @James great solution. It avoids paste and parse and is a little bit faster:

vec <- do.call('c', lapply(seq_along(start), function(i) call(':', start[i], end[i])))
mat <- matrix(vec,ncol=2,byrow=T)

Timing it:

set.seed(42)
n <- 1e5
start <- sample(10, n, replace=TRUE)
end <- start + sample( 3, n, replace=TRUE)*2-1

# @James code: 6,64 secs
system.time({
  for(i in 1:10) {
    txt <- paste("c(",paste(start,end,sep=":",collapse=","),")",sep="")
    vec <- eval(parse(text=txt))
    mat <- matrix(vec,ncol=2,byrow=T)
  }
})

# My variant: 5.17 secs
system.time({
  for(i in 1:10) {
    vec <- do.call('c', lapply(seq_along(start), function(i) call(':', start[i], end[i])))
    mat <- matrix(vec,ncol=2,byrow=T)
  }
})
share|improve this answer
    
The great thing about james' code is that it doesn't need a for loop at all. –  CAPSLOCK Oct 19 '11 at 16:52
    
@Ellipsis... Well, neither does this one. It uses lapply :-) ...and end up being somewhat faster. The number of characters to type is pretty much the same too. So this is more efficient even on a time/character basis. –  Tommy Oct 19 '11 at 18:20
    
...and it avoids objections against using parse: stackoverflow.com/questions/4339077/… –  Tommy Oct 19 '11 at 18:31

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