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Is it possible to BULK INSERT (SQL Server) a CSV file in which the fields are only OCCASSIONALLY surrounded by quotes? Specifically, quotes only surround those fields that contain a ",".

In other words, I have data that looks like this (the first row contain headers):

id, company, rep, employees
729216,INGRAM MICRO INC.,"Stuart, Becky",523
729235,"GREAT PLAINS ENERGY, INC.","Nelson, Beena",114
721177,GEORGE WESTON BAKERIES INC,"Hogan, Meg",253

Because the quotes aren't consistent, I can't use '","' as a delimiter, and I don't know how to create a format file that accounts for this.

I tried using ',' as a delimter and loading it into a temporary table where every column is a varchar, then using some kludgy processing to strip out the quotes, but that doesn't work either, because the fields that contain ',' are split into multiple columns.

Unfortunately, I don't have the ability to manipulate the CSV file beforehand.

Is this hopeless?

Many thanks in advance for any advice.

By the way, i saw this post SQL bulk import from csv, but in that case, EVERY field was consistently wrapped in quotes. So, in that case, he could use ',' as a delimiter, then strip out the quotes afterwards.

share|improve this question

12 Answers 12

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You are going to need to preprocess the file, period.

If you really really need to do this, here is the code. I wrote this because I absolutely had no choice. It is utility code and I'm not proud of it, but it works. The approach is not to get SQL to understand quoted fields, but instead manipulate the file to use an entirely different delimiter.

EDIT: Here is the code in a github repo. It's been improved and now comes with unit tests! https://github.com/chrisclark/Redelim-it

This function takes an input file and will replace all field-delimiting commas (NOT commas inside quoted-text fields, just the actual delimiting ones) with a new delimiter. You can then tell sql server to use the new field delimiter instead of a comma. In the version of the function here, the placeholder is <TMP> (I feel confident this will not appear in the original csv - if it does, brace for explosions).

Therefore after running this function you import in sql by doing something like:

BULK INSERT MyTable
FROM 'C:\FileCreatedFromThisFunction.csv'
WITH
(
FIELDTERMINATOR = '<*TMP*>',
ROWTERMINATOR = '\n'
)

And without further ado, the terrible, awful function that I apologize in advance for inflicting on you (edit - I've posted a working program that does this instead of just the function on my blog here):

Private Function CsvToOtherDelimiter(ByVal InputFile As String, ByVal OutputFile As String) As Integer

        Dim PH1 As String = "<*TMP*>"

        Dim objReader As StreamReader = Nothing
        Dim count As Integer = 0 'This will also serve as a primary key'
        Dim sb As New System.Text.StringBuilder

        Try
            objReader = New StreamReader(File.OpenRead(InputFile), System.Text.Encoding.Default)
        Catch ex As Exception
            UpdateStatus(ex.Message)
        End Try

        If objReader Is Nothing Then
            UpdateStatus("Invalid file: " & InputFile)
            count = -1
            Exit Function
        End If

        'grab the first line
    Dim line = reader.ReadLine()
    'and advance to the next line b/c the first line is column headings
    If hasHeaders Then
        line = Trim(reader.ReadLine)
    End If

    While Not String.IsNullOrEmpty(line) 'loop through each line

        count += 1

        'Replace commas with our custom-made delimiter
        line = line.Replace(",", ph1)

        'Find a quoted part of the line, which could legitimately contain commas.
        'In that case we will need to identify the quoted section and swap commas back in for our custom placeholder.
        Dim starti = line.IndexOf(ph1 & """", 0)
        If line.IndexOf("""",0) = 0 then starti=0

        While starti > -1 'loop through quoted fields

            Dim FieldTerminatorFound As Boolean = False

            'Find end quote token (originally  a ",)
            Dim endi As Integer = line.IndexOf("""" & ph1, starti)

            If endi < 0 Then
                FieldTerminatorFound = True
                If endi < 0 Then endi = line.Length - 1
            End If

            While Not FieldTerminatorFound

                'Find any more quotes that are part of that sequence, if any
                Dim backChar As String = """" 'thats one quote
                Dim quoteCount = 0
                While backChar = """"
                    quoteCount += 1
                    backChar = line.Chars(endi - quoteCount)
                End While

                If quoteCount Mod 2 = 1 Then 'odd number of quotes. real field terminator
                    FieldTerminatorFound = True
                Else 'keep looking
                    endi = line.IndexOf("""" & ph1, endi + 1)
                End If
            End While

            'Grab the quoted field from the line, now that we have the start and ending indices
            Dim source = line.Substring(starti + ph1.Length, endi - starti - ph1.Length + 1)

            'And swap the commas back in
            line = line.Replace(source, source.Replace(ph1, ","))

            'Find the next quoted field
            '                If endi >= line.Length - 1 Then endi = line.Length 'During the swap, the length of line shrinks so an endi value at the end of the line will fail
            starti = line.IndexOf(ph1 & """", starti + ph1.Length)

        End While

            line = objReader.ReadLine

        End While

        objReader.Close()

        SaveTextToFile(sb.ToString, OutputFile)

        Return count

    End Function
share|improve this answer

It isn't possible to do a bulk insert for this file, from MSDN:

To be usable as a data file for bulk import, a CSV file must comply with the following restrictions:

  • Data fields never contain the field terminator.
  • Either none or all of the values in a data field are enclosed in quotation marks ("").

(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188609.aspx)

Some simple text processing should be all that's required to get the file ready for import. Alternatively your users could be required to either format the file according to the se guidelines or use something other than a comma as a delimiter (e.g |)

share|improve this answer
    
Macros - thanks for this. Looks definitive. I thought about pre-processing the file - e.g., changing all the commas to pipes, but I don't know how to distinguish the the commas that separate fields from the commas in the values. Is there an easy way to do that? –  mattstuehler Apr 23 '09 at 17:38
    
Regular Expressions may help however I'm not sure how well they would deal with conditions like multiple commas inside the quotes and multiple quoted strings in one line. Algorithmically you could parse each string replacing each comma with a pipe until you reach a " at which point replacement is switched off until you reach a closing quote. May not be the most efficient though! –  Macros Apr 23 '09 at 18:08
    
I had the same thought - parsing row by row, field by field, even character by character. With a little elbow grease, that'd work, but I doubt it'd be very efficient. I was hoping there'd be a quick an easy answer. There should be - seems like this must come up often, since it looks like Excel formats data like this when you try to save a spreadsheet as a CSV file. Oh well. –  mattstuehler Apr 23 '09 at 18:51
    
You would think that a CSV file that Excel can create would be a valid format to bulk insert into SQL Server, OR, you would expect the bulk inserter to be able to take Excel created files and import those. No ? Well I would think. Maybe that's just me. –  cometbill Jul 1 '10 at 8:37

I have also created a function to convert a CSV to a usable format for Bulk Insert. I used the answered post by Chris Clark as a starting point to create the following C# function.

I ended up using a regular expression to find the fields. I then recreated the file line by line, writing it to a new file as I went, thus avoiding having the entire file loaded into memory.

private void CsvToOtherDelimiter(string CSVFile, System.Data.Linq.Mapping.MetaTable tbl)
{
    char PH1 = '|';
    StringBuilder ln;

    //Confirm file exists. Else, throw exception
    if (File.Exists(CSVFile))
    {
        using (TextReader tr = new StreamReader(CSVFile))
        {
            //Use a temp file to store our conversion
            using (TextWriter tw = new StreamWriter(CSVFile + ".tmp"))
            {
                string line = tr.ReadLine();
                //If we have already converted, no need to reconvert.
                //NOTE: We make the assumption here that the input header file 
                //      doesn't have a PH1 value unless it's already been converted.
                if (line.IndexOf(PH1) >= 0)
                {
                    tw.Close();
                    tr.Close();
                    File.Delete(CSVFile + ".tmp");
                    return;
                }
                //Loop through input file
                while (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(line))
                {
                    ln = new StringBuilder();

                    //1. Use Regex expression to find comma separated values 
                    //using quotes as optional text qualifiers 
                    //(what MS EXCEL does when you import a csv file)
                    //2. Remove text qualifier quotes from data
                    //3. Replace any values of PH1 found in column data 
                    //with an equivalent character
                    //Regex:  \A[^,]*(?=,)|(?:[^",]*"[^"]*"[^",]*)+|[^",]*"[^"]*\Z|(?<=,)[^,]*(?=,)|(?<=,)[^,]*\Z|\A[^,]*\Z
                    List<string> fieldList = Regex.Matches(line, @"\A[^,]*(?=,)|(?:[^"",]*""[^""]*""[^"",]*)+|[^"",]*""[^""]*\Z|(?<=,)[^,]*(?=,)|(?<=,)[^,]*\Z|\A[^,]*\Z")
                            .Cast<Match>()
                            .Select(m => RemoveCSVQuotes(m.Value).Replace(PH1, '¦'))
                            .ToList<string>();

                    //Add the list of fields to ln, separated by PH1
                    fieldList.ToList().ForEach(m => ln.Append(m + PH1));

                    //Write to file. Don't include trailing PH1 value.
                    tw.WriteLine(ln.ToString().Substring(0, ln.ToString().LastIndexOf(PH1)));

                    line = tr.ReadLine();
                }


                tw.Close();
            }
            tr.Close();

            //Optional:  replace input file with output file
            File.Delete(CSVFile);
            File.Move(CSVFile + ".tmp", CSVFile);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("Source file {0} not found", CSVFile));
    }
}
//The output file no longer needs quotes as a text qualifier, so remove them
private string RemoveCSVQuotes(string value)
{
    //if is empty string, then remove double quotes
    if (value == @"""""") value = "";
    //remove any double quotes, then any quotes on ends
    value = value.Replace(@"""""", @"""");
    if (value.Length >= 2)
        if (value.Substring(0, 1) == @"""")
            value = value.Substring(1, value.Length - 2);
    return value;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
works great but replaces files and doesn't account for accented characters so make sure to include the encoding in the streamreader. Other than that. Thanks!=] –  Oak Aug 6 '13 at 20:00

I found the answer by Chris very helpful, but I wanted to run it from within SQL Server using T-SQL (and not using CLR), so I converted his code to T-SQL code. But then I took it one step further by wrapping everything up in a stored procedure that did the following:

  1. use bulk insert to initially import the CSV file
  2. clean up the lines using Chris's code
  3. return the results in a table format

For my needs, I further cleaned up the lines by removing quotes around values and converting two double quotes to one double quote (I think that's the correct method).

CREATE PROCEDURE SSP_CSVToTable

-- Add the parameters for the stored procedure here
@InputFile nvarchar(4000)
, @FirstLine int

AS

BEGIN

-- SET NOCOUNT ON added to prevent extra result sets from
-- interfering with SELECT statements.
SET NOCOUNT ON;

--convert the CSV file to a table
--clean up the lines so that commas are handles correctly

DECLARE @sql nvarchar(4000)
DECLARE @PH1 nvarchar(50)
DECLARE @LINECOUNT int -- This will also serve as a primary key
DECLARE @CURLINE int
DECLARE @Line nvarchar(4000)
DECLARE @starti int
DECLARE @endi int
DECLARE @FieldTerminatorFound bit
DECLARE @backChar nvarchar(4000)
DECLARE @quoteCount int
DECLARE @source nvarchar(4000)
DECLARE @COLCOUNT int
DECLARE @CURCOL int
DECLARE @ColVal nvarchar(4000)

-- new delimiter
SET @PH1 = '†'

-- create single column table to hold each line of file
CREATE TABLE [#CSVLine]([line] nvarchar(4000))

-- bulk insert into temp table
-- cannot use variable path with bulk insert
-- so we must run using dynamic sql
SET @Sql = 'BULK INSERT #CSVLine
FROM ''' + @InputFile + '''
WITH
(
FIRSTROW=' + CAST(@FirstLine as varchar) + ',
FIELDTERMINATOR = ''\n'',
ROWTERMINATOR = ''\n''
)'

-- run dynamic statement to populate temp table
EXEC(@sql)

-- get number of lines in table
SET @LINECOUNT = @@ROWCOUNT

-- add identity column to table so that we can loop through it
ALTER TABLE [#CSVLine] ADD [RowId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL

IF @LINECOUNT > 0
BEGIN
    -- cycle through each line, cleaning each line
    SET @CURLINE = 1
    WHILE @CURLINE <= @LINECOUNT
    BEGIN
        -- get current line
        SELECT @line = line
          FROM #CSVLine
         WHERE [RowId] = @CURLINE

        -- Replace commas with our custom-made delimiter
        SET @Line = REPLACE(@Line, ',', @PH1)

        -- Find a quoted part of the line, which could legitimately contain commas.
        -- In that case we will need to identify the quoted section and swap commas back in for our custom placeholder.
        SET @starti = CHARINDEX(@PH1 + '"' ,@Line, 0)
        If CHARINDEX('"', @Line, 0) = 0 SET @starti = 0

        -- loop through quoted fields
        WHILE @starti > 0 
        BEGIN
            SET @FieldTerminatorFound = 0

            -- Find end quote token (originally  a ",)
            SET @endi = CHARINDEX('"' + @PH1, @Line, @starti)  -- sLine.IndexOf("""" & PH1, starti)

            IF @endi < 1
            BEGIN
                SET @FieldTerminatorFound = 1
                If @endi < 1 SET @endi = LEN(@Line) - 1
            END

            WHILE @FieldTerminatorFound = 0
            BEGIN
                -- Find any more quotes that are part of that sequence, if any
                SET @backChar = '"' -- thats one quote
                SET @quoteCount = 0

                WHILE @backChar = '"'
                BEGIN
                    SET @quoteCount = @quoteCount + 1
                    SET @backChar = SUBSTRING(@Line, @endi-@quoteCount, 1) -- sLine.Chars(endi - quoteCount)
                END

                IF (@quoteCount % 2) = 1
                BEGIN
                    -- odd number of quotes. real field terminator
                    SET @FieldTerminatorFound = 1
                END
                ELSE 
                BEGIN
                    -- keep looking
                    SET @endi = CHARINDEX('"' + @PH1, @Line, @endi + 1) -- sLine.IndexOf("""" & PH1, endi + 1)
                END

            END

            -- Grab the quoted field from the line, now that we have the start and ending indices
            SET @source = SUBSTRING(@Line, @starti + LEN(@PH1), @endi - @starti - LEN(@PH1) + 1) 
            -- sLine.Substring(starti + PH1.Length, endi - starti - PH1.Length + 1)

            -- And swap the commas back in
            SET @Line = REPLACE(@Line, @source, REPLACE(@source, @PH1, ','))
            --sLine.Replace(source, source.Replace(PH1, ","))

            -- Find the next quoted field
            -- If endi >= line.Length - 1 Then endi = line.Length 'During the swap, the length of line shrinks so an endi value at the end of the line will fail
            SET @starti = CHARINDEX(@PH1 + '"', @Line, @starti + LEN(@PH1))
            --sLine.IndexOf(PH1 & """", starti + PH1.Length)

        END

        -- get table based on current line
        IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Line') IS NOT NULL
            DROP TABLE #Line

        -- converts a delimited list into a table
        SELECT *
        INTO #Line
        FROM dbo.iter_charlist_to_table(@Line,@PH1)

        -- get number of columns in line
        SET @COLCOUNT = @@ROWCOUNT

        -- dynamically create CSV temp table to hold CSV columns and lines
        -- only need to create once
        IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#CSV') IS NULL
        BEGIN
            -- create initial structure of CSV table
            CREATE TABLE [#CSV]([Col1] nvarchar(100))

            -- dynamically add a column for each column found in the first line
            SET @CURCOL = 1
            WHILE @CURCOL <= @COLCOUNT
            BEGIN
                -- first column already exists, don't need to add
                IF @CURCOL > 1 
                BEGIN
                    -- add field
                    SET @sql = 'ALTER TABLE [#CSV] ADD [Col' + Cast(@CURCOL as varchar) + '] nvarchar(100)'

                    --print @sql

                    -- this adds the fields to the temp table
                    EXEC(@sql)
                END

                -- go to next column
                SET @CURCOL = @CURCOL + 1
            END
        END

        -- build dynamic sql to insert current line into CSV table
        SET @sql = 'INSERT INTO [#CSV] VALUES('

        -- loop through line table, dynamically adding each column value
        SET @CURCOL = 1
        WHILE @CURCOL <= @COLCOUNT
        BEGIN
            -- get current column
            Select @ColVal = str 
              From #Line 
             Where listpos = @CURCOL

            IF LEN(@ColVal) > 0
            BEGIN
                -- remove quotes from beginning if exist
                IF LEFT(@ColVal,1) = '"'
                    SET @ColVal = RIGHT(@ColVal, LEN(@ColVal) - 1)

                -- remove quotes from end if exist
                IF RIGHT(@ColVal,1) = '"'
                    SET @ColVal = LEFT(@ColVal, LEN(@ColVal) - 1)
            END

            -- write column value
            -- make value sql safe by replacing single quotes with two single quotes
            -- also, replace two double quotes with a single double quote
            SET @sql = @sql + '''' + REPLACE(REPLACE(@ColVal, '''',''''''), '""', '"') + ''''

            -- add comma separater except for the last record
            IF @CURCOL <> @COLCOUNT
                SET @sql = @sql + ','

            -- go to next column
            SET @CURCOL = @CURCOL + 1
        END

        -- close sql statement
        SET @sql = @sql + ')'

        --print @sql

        -- run sql to add line to table
        EXEC(@sql)

        -- move to next line
        SET @CURLINE = @CURLINE + 1

    END

END

-- return CSV table
SELECT * FROM [#CSV]

END

GO

The stored procedure makes use of this helper function that parses a string into a table (thanks Erland Sommarskog!):

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[iter_charlist_to_table]
                (@list      ntext,
                 @delimiter nchar(1) = N',')
     RETURNS @tbl TABLE (listpos int IDENTITY(1, 1) NOT NULL,
                         str     varchar(4000),
                         nstr    nvarchar(2000)) AS

BEGIN
  DECLARE @pos      int,
          @textpos  int,
          @chunklen smallint,
          @tmpstr   nvarchar(4000),
          @leftover nvarchar(4000),
          @tmpval   nvarchar(4000)

  SET @textpos = 1
  SET @leftover = ''
  WHILE @textpos <= datalength(@list) / 2
  BEGIN
     SET @chunklen = 4000 - datalength(@leftover) / 2
     SET @tmpstr = @leftover + substring(@list, @textpos, @chunklen)
     SET @textpos = @textpos + @chunklen

     SET @pos = charindex(@delimiter, @tmpstr)

     WHILE @pos > 0
     BEGIN
        SET @tmpval = ltrim(rtrim(left(@tmpstr, @pos - 1)))
        INSERT @tbl (str, nstr) VALUES(@tmpval, @tmpval)
        SET @tmpstr = substring(@tmpstr, @pos + 1, len(@tmpstr))
        SET @pos = charindex(@delimiter, @tmpstr)
     END

     SET @leftover = @tmpstr
  END

  INSERT @tbl(str, nstr) VALUES (ltrim(rtrim(@leftover)), ltrim(rtrim(@leftover)))

RETURN

END

Here's how I call it from T-SQL. In this case, I'm inserting the results into a temp table, so I create the temp table first:

    -- create temp table for file import
CREATE TABLE #temp
(
    CustomerCode nvarchar(100) NULL,
    Name nvarchar(100) NULL,
    [Address] nvarchar(100) NULL,
    City nvarchar(100) NULL,
    [State] nvarchar(100) NULL,
    Zip nvarchar(100) NULL,
    OrderNumber nvarchar(100) NULL,
    TimeWindow nvarchar(100) NULL,
    OrderType nvarchar(100) NULL,
    Duration nvarchar(100) NULL,
    [Weight] nvarchar(100) NULL,
    Volume nvarchar(100) NULL
)

-- convert the CSV file into a table
INSERT #temp
EXEC [dbo].[SSP_CSVToTable]
     @InputFile = @FileLocation
    ,@FirstLine = @FirstImportRow

I haven't tested the performance much, but it works well for what I need - importing CSV files with less than 1000 rows. However, it might choke on really large files.

Hopefully someone else also finds it useful.

Cheers!

share|improve this answer
    
murmy, this is unbelievably awesome! –  Phillip Dec 11 '12 at 18:59

An alternate method--assuming you don't have a load of fields or expect a quote to appear in the data itself would be to use the REPLACE function.

UPDATE dbo.tablename 
        SET dbo.tablename.target_field = REPLACE(t.importedValue, '"', '')
FROM #tempTable t
WHERE dbo.tablename.target_id = t.importedID;

I have used it. I can't make any claims regarding performance. It is just a quick and dirty way to get around the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
-1: this doesn't account for the issue of the delimiter appearing within a quoted field, which has the effect of throwing off the column alignment for all subsequent columns in the affected row. –  Marc L. Dec 4 '13 at 22:30

This might be more complicated or involved than what your willing to use, but ...

If you can implement the logic for parsing the lines into fields in VB or C#, you can do this using a CLR table valued function (TVF).

A CLR TVF can be a good performing way to read data in from external source when you want to have some C# or VB code separate the data into columns and/or adjust the values.

You have to be willing to add a CLR assembly to your database (and one that allows external or unsafe operations so it can open files). This can get a bit complicated or involved, but might be worth it for the flexibility you get.

I had some large files that needed to be regularly loaded to tables as fast as possible, but certain code translations needed to be performed on some columns and special handling was needed to load values that would have otherwise caused datatype errors with a plain bulk insert.

In short, a CLR TVF lets you run C# or VB code against each line of the file with bulk insert like performance (although you may need to worry about logging). The example in the SQL Server documentation lets you create a TVF to read from the event log that you could use as a starting point.

Note that the code in the CLR TVF can only access the database in an init stage before the first row is processed (eg. no lookups for each row - you use a normal TVF on top of this to do such things). You don't appear to need this based on your question.

Also note, each CLR TVF must have its output columns explicitly specified, so you can't write a generic one that is reusable for each different csv file you might have.

You could write one CLR TVF to read whole lines from the file, returning a one column result set, then use normal TVFs to read from that for each type of file. This requires the code to parse each line to be written in T-SQL, but avoids having to write many CLR TVFs.

share|improve this answer
    
Brett, Sorry - I was on vacation, and just now saw this response. CLR-TVF isn't something I'm familiar with, but I'm definitely going to look into it. Many thanks for this really interesting suggestion! –  mattstuehler Oct 8 '09 at 21:50

I found few issues while having ',' inside our fields like Mike,”456 2nd St, Apt 5".

Solution to this issue is @ http://crazzycoding.blogspot.com/2010/11/import-csv-file-into-sql-server-using.html

Thanks, - Ashish

share|improve this answer

Chris, Thanks a bunch for this!! You saved my biscuits!! I could not believe that bulk loader wouldn't handle this case when XL does such a nice job..don't these guys see eachother in the halls??? Anyway...I needed a ConsoleApplication version so here is what I hacked together. It's down and dirty but it works like a champ! I hardcoded the delimiter and commented out the header as they were not needed for my app.

I wish I could also paste a nice big beer in here for ya too.

Geeze, I have no idea why the End Module and Public Class are outside the code block...srry!

    Module Module1

    Sub Main()

        Dim arrArgs() As String = Command.Split(",")
        Dim i As Integer
        Dim obj As New ReDelimIt()

        Console.Write(vbNewLine & vbNewLine)

        If arrArgs(0) <> Nothing Then
            For i = LBound(arrArgs) To UBound(arrArgs)
                Console.Write("Parameter " & i & " is " & arrArgs(i) & vbNewLine)
            Next


            obj.ProcessFile(arrArgs(0), arrArgs(1))

        Else
            Console.Write("Usage Test1 <inputfile>,<outputfile>")
        End If

        Console.Write(vbNewLine & vbNewLine)
    End Sub

 End Module

 Public Class ReDelimIt

    Public Function ProcessFile(ByVal InputFile As String, ByVal OutputFile As String) As Integer

        Dim ph1 As String = "|"

        Dim objReader As System.IO.StreamReader = Nothing
        Dim count As Integer = 0 'This will also serve as a primary key
        Dim sb As New System.Text.StringBuilder

        Try
            objReader = New System.IO.StreamReader(System.IO.File.OpenRead(InputFile), System.Text.Encoding.Default)
        Catch ex As Exception
            MsgBox(ex.Message)
        End Try

        If objReader Is Nothing Then
            MsgBox("Invalid file: " & InputFile)
            count = -1
            Exit Function
        End If

        'grab the first line
        Dim line = objReader.ReadLine()
        'and advance to the next line b/c the first line is column headings
        'Removed Check Headers can put in if needed.
        'If chkHeaders.Checked Then
        'line = objReader.ReadLine
        'End If

        While Not String.IsNullOrEmpty(line) 'loop through each line

            count += 1

            'Replace commas with our custom-made delimiter
            line = line.Replace(",", ph1)

            'Find a quoted part of the line, which could legitimately contain commas.
            'In that case we will need to identify the quoted section and swap commas back in for our custom placeholder.
            Dim starti = line.IndexOf(ph1 & """", 0)

            While starti > -1 'loop through quoted fields

                'Find end quote token (originally  a ",)
                Dim endi = line.IndexOf("""" & ph1, starti)

                'The end quote token could be a false positive because there could occur a ", sequence.
                'It would be double-quoted ("",) so check for that here
                Dim check1 = line.IndexOf("""""" & ph1, starti)

                'A """, sequence can occur if a quoted field ends in a quote.
                'In this case, the above check matches, but we actually SHOULD process this as an end quote token
                Dim check2 = line.IndexOf("""""""" & ph1, starti)

                'If we are in the check1 ("",) situation, keep searching for an end quote token
                'The +1 and +2 accounts for the extra length of the checked sequences
                While (endi = check1 + 1 AndAlso endi <> check2 + 2) 'loop through "false" tokens in the quoted fields
                    endi = line.IndexOf("""" & ph1, endi + 1)
                    check1 = line.IndexOf("""""" & ph1, check1 + 1)
                    check2 = line.IndexOf("""""""" & ph1, check2 + 1)
                End While

                'We have searched for an end token (",) but can't find one, so that means the line ends in a "
                If endi < 0 Then endi = line.Length - 1

                'Grab the quoted field from the line, now that we have the start and ending indices
                Dim source = line.Substring(starti + ph1.Length, endi - starti - ph1.Length + 1)

                'And swap the commas back in
                line = line.Replace(source, source.Replace(ph1, ","))

                'Find the next quoted field
                If endi >= line.Length - 1 Then endi = line.Length 'During the swap, the length of line shrinks so an endi value at the end of the line will fail
                starti = line.IndexOf(ph1 & """", starti + ph1.Length)

            End While

            'Add our primary key to the line
            ' Removed for now
            'If chkAddKey.Checked Then
            'line = String.Concat(count.ToString, ph1, line)
            ' End If

            sb.AppendLine(line)

            line = objReader.ReadLine

        End While

        objReader.Close()

        SaveTextToFile(sb.ToString, OutputFile)

        Return count

    End Function

    Public Function SaveTextToFile(ByVal strData As String, ByVal FullPath As String) As Boolean
        Dim bAns As Boolean = False
        Dim objReader As System.IO.StreamWriter
        Try
            objReader = New System.IO.StreamWriter(FullPath, False, System.Text.Encoding.Default)
            objReader.Write(strData)
            objReader.Close()
            bAns = True
        Catch Ex As Exception
            Throw Ex
        End Try
        Return bAns
    End Function

End Class
share|improve this answer

More often than not, this issue is caused by users exporting an Excel file to CSV.

There are two ways around this problem:

  1. Export from Excel using a macro, as per Microsoft's suggestion
  2. Or the really easy way:
    • Open the CSV in Excel.
    • Save as Excel file. (.xls or .xlsx).
    • Import that file into SQL Server as an Excel file.
    • Chuckle to yourself because you didn't have to code anything like the solutions above.... muhahahaha

Import as Excel file

Here's some SQL if you really want to script it (after saving the CSV as Excel):

select * 
into SQLServerTable FROM OPENROWSET('Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0', 
    'Excel 8.0;Database=D:\testing.xls;HDR=YES', 
    'SELECT * FROM [Sheet1$]')
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the simplest solution although it is not mention to work on a batch scenario as you require EXCEL to be installed. –  alzaimar Jan 20 at 6:45

You should be able to specifiy not only the field separator, which should be [,] but also the text qualifier, which in this case would be ["]. Using [] to enclose that so there's no confusion with ".

share|improve this answer
    
Kibbee - thanks for the answer. But I'm not able to use any db tools - just T-SQL, since this is something that will be automated. Essentially, this application has a feature that allows users to upload CSV files, and then the app will load them into a database table. And I don't know how to set a text qualifier with the "BULK INSERT" command. Can you expand on that? –  mattstuehler Apr 23 '09 at 16:26

This code work for me :

 public bool CSVFileRead(string fullPathWithFileName, string fileNameModified, string tableName)
    {
        SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationSettings.AppSettings["dbConnectionString"]);
        string filepath = fullPathWithFileName;
        StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(filepath);
        string line = sr.ReadLine();
        string[] value = line.Split(',');
        DataTable dt = new DataTable();
        DataRow row;
        foreach (string dc in value)
        {
            dt.Columns.Add(new DataColumn(dc));
        }
        while (!sr.EndOfStream)
        {
            //string[] stud = sr.ReadLine().Split(',');
            //for (int i = 0; i < stud.Length; i++)
            //{
            //    stud[i] = stud[i].Replace("\"", "");
            //}
            //value = stud;
            value = sr.ReadLine().Split(',');
            if (value.Length == dt.Columns.Count)
            {
                row = dt.NewRow();
                row.ItemArray = value;
                dt.Rows.Add(row);
            }
        }
        SqlBulkCopy bc = new SqlBulkCopy(con.ConnectionString, SqlBulkCopyOptions.TableLock);
        bc.DestinationTableName = tableName;
        bc.BatchSize = dt.Rows.Count;
        con.Open();
        bc.WriteToServer(dt);
        bc.Close();
        con.Close();

        return true;
    }
share|improve this answer

Create a VB.NET Program to convert to new Delimiter using 4.5 Framework TextFieldParser This will automatically handle Text qualified fields

Modified above code to use built in TextFieldParser

Module Module1

Sub Main()

    Dim arrArgs() As String = Command.Split(",")
    Dim i As Integer
    Dim obj As New ReDelimIt()
    Dim InputFile As String = ""
    Dim OutPutFile As String = ""
    Dim NewDelimiter As String = ""

    Console.Write(vbNewLine & vbNewLine)

    If Not IsNothing(arrArgs(0)) Then
        For i = LBound(arrArgs) To UBound(arrArgs)
            Console.Write("Parameter " & i & " is " & arrArgs(i) & vbNewLine)
        Next
        InputFile = arrArgs(0)
        If Not IsNothing(arrArgs(1)) Then
            If Not String.IsNullOrEmpty(arrArgs(1)) Then
                OutPutFile = arrArgs(1)
            Else
                OutPutFile = InputFile.Replace("csv", "pipe")
            End If
        Else
            OutPutFile = InputFile.Replace("csv", "pipe")
        End If
        If Not IsNothing(arrArgs(2)) Then
            If Not String.IsNullOrEmpty(arrArgs(2)) Then
                NewDelimiter = arrArgs(2)
            Else
                NewDelimiter = "|"
            End If
        Else
            NewDelimiter = "|"
        End If
        obj.ConvertCSVFile(InputFile,OutPutFile,NewDelimiter)

    Else
        Console.Write("Usage ChangeFileDelimiter <inputfile>,<outputfile>,<NewDelimiter>")
    End If
    obj = Nothing
    Console.Write(vbNewLine & vbNewLine)
    'Console.ReadLine()

End Sub

End Module

Public Class ReDelimIt

Public Function ConvertCSVFile(ByVal InputFile As String, ByVal OutputFile As String, Optional ByVal NewDelimiter As String = "|") As Integer
    Using MyReader As New Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser(InputFile)
        MyReader.TextFieldType = FileIO.FieldType.Delimited
        MyReader.SetDelimiters(",")
        Dim sb As New System.Text.StringBuilder
        Dim strLine As String = ""
        Dim currentRow As String()
        While Not MyReader.EndOfData
            Try
                currentRow = MyReader.ReadFields()
                Dim currentField As String
                strLine = ""
                For Each currentField In currentRow
                    'MsgBox(currentField)
                    If strLine = "" Then
                        strLine = strLine & currentField
                    Else
                        strLine = strLine & NewDelimiter & currentField
                    End If
                Next
                sb.AppendLine(strLine)
            Catch ex As Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.MalformedLineException
                'MsgBox("Line " & ex.Message & "is not valid and will be skipped.")
                Console.WriteLine("Line " & ex.Message & "is not valid and will be skipped.")
            End Try
        End While
        SaveTextToFile(sb.ToString, OutputFile)
    End Using

    Return Err.Number

End Function

Public Function SaveTextToFile(ByVal strData As String, ByVal FullPath As String) As Boolean
    Dim bAns As Boolean = False
    Dim objReader As System.IO.StreamWriter
    Try
        If FileIO.FileSystem.FileExists(FullPath) Then
            Kill(FullPath)
        End If
        objReader = New System.IO.StreamWriter(FullPath, False, System.Text.Encoding.Default)
        objReader.Write(strData)
        objReader.Close()
        bAns = True
    Catch Ex As Exception
        Throw Ex
    End Try
    Return bAns
End Function

End Class

share|improve this answer

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