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I have the following events for a Backbone View. Its a product view - with three tabs ("All", "Top 3", "Top 5")

Can I somehow pass a parameter into the method declaration so that it is equivalent to the following (this doesn't work)?

    events : {
        "click #top-all":          "topProducts(1)"
        "click #top-three":      "topProducts(2)"
        "click #top-ten":         "topProducts(3)"
    },
    topProducts(obj){
      // Do stuff based on obj value
    }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 53 down vote accepted

You could put the extra argument in a data attribute on the clickable item instead; something like this:

<a id="top-all" data-pancakes="1">

And then topProducts can figure it out itself:

topProducts: function(ev) {
    var pancakes = $(ev.currentTarget).data('pancakes');
    // And continue on as though we were called as topProducts(pancakes)
    // ...
}
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2  
"this" points to the Backbone View here so doing a direct $(this) will not give the DOM element corresponding to the element clicked. –  papdel Oct 20 '11 at 7:16
1  
@papdel: Right, sorry about that. But you can use ev.target (where ev is the event) instead. Have a look at my fixed version please. –  mu is too short Oct 20 '11 at 18:16
    
Thanks, in general $(ev.target) gets you the dom element which triggered the event so this is immensely helpful. –  papdel Nov 6 '11 at 16:15
2  
@papdel: Yeah, ev.target (when you can't rely on this) combined with data attributes is a great way to keep track of things. –  mu is too short Nov 6 '11 at 18:48
1  
@whistler: { 'click #top-all': 'topProducts', 'click #top-three': 'topProducts', ... }. –  mu is too short Apr 27 '12 at 21:59

What you can do, is just check the id of the element which is received as currentTarget in arguments.

topProduct: function(e) {
    console.log(arguments[0].currentTarget.id);
    var id = arguments[0].currentTarget.id;

    if (id == "top-all") // Do something
    else if (id == "top-5") // Do something
    else if (id == "top-3") // Do something
}
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1  
This is actually better than the selected answer as it doesn't require any modification to the DOM. –  ggutenberg Mar 9 '13 at 0:45
1  
This answer is by far better than adding an unnecessary data attribute. –  Jordan May 17 '13 at 18:41

You can do so using closures:

EventObject.on(event, (function(){
    var arg = data; // Closure preserves this data
    return function(){
        doThis(arg);
    }   
})());
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I generally prefer to do something like this:

events : {
   "click #top-all":    function(){this.topProducts(1);}
   "click #top-three":  function(){this.topProducts(2);}
   "click #top-ten":    function(){this.topProducts(3);}
},
topProducts(obj){
   // Do stuff based on obj value
}
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you are my hero –  David T. Dec 15 '14 at 1:43

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